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Stone forming risk of calcium citrate supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women.
J Urol 2004; 172(3):958-61JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We evaluated the effect of calcium citrate supplementation alone or in combination with potassium citrate on the stone forming propensity in healthy postmenopausal women.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A total of 18 postmenopausal women without stones underwent a randomized trial of 4 phases comprised of 2 weeks of treatment with placebo, calcium citrate (400 mg calcium twice daily), potassium citrate (20 mEq twice daily), and calcium citrate and potassium citrate (at same doses). During the last 2 days of each phase urine was collected in 24-hour pools for complete stone risk analysis.

RESULTS

Compared to placebo, calcium citrate increased urinary calcium and citrate but decreased urinary oxalate and phosphate. Urinary saturation of calcium oxalate, brushite and undissociated uric acid did not change. Potassium citrate decreased urinary calcium, and increased urinary citrate and pH. It decreased urinary saturation of calcium oxalate and undissociated uric acid, and did not change the saturation of brushite. When calcium citrate was combined with potassium citrate, urinary calcium remained high, urinary citrate increased even further and urinary oxalate remained reduced from the calcium citrate alone, thereby marginally decreasing the urinary saturation of calcium oxalate. Urinary pH increased, decreasing urinary undissociated uric acid. The increase in pH increased the saturation of brushite despite the decrease in urinary phosphorus.

CONCLUSIONS

Calcium citrate supplementation does not increase the risk of stone formation in healthy postmenopausal women. The co-administered potassium citrate may provide additional protection against formation of uric acid and calcium oxalate stones.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8885, USA. Khashayar.sakhaee@utsouthwestern.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15311008

Citation

Sakhaee, Khashayar, et al. "Stone Forming Risk of Calcium Citrate Supplementation in Healthy Postmenopausal Women." The Journal of Urology, vol. 172, no. 3, 2004, pp. 958-61.
Sakhaee K, Poindexter JR, Griffith CS, et al. Stone forming risk of calcium citrate supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women. J Urol. 2004;172(3):958-61.
Sakhaee, K., Poindexter, J. R., Griffith, C. S., & Pak, C. Y. (2004). Stone forming risk of calcium citrate supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women. The Journal of Urology, 172(3), pp. 958-61.
Sakhaee K, et al. Stone Forming Risk of Calcium Citrate Supplementation in Healthy Postmenopausal Women. J Urol. 2004;172(3):958-61. PubMed PMID: 15311008.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stone forming risk of calcium citrate supplementation in healthy postmenopausal women. AU - Sakhaee,Khashayar, AU - Poindexter,John R, AU - Griffith,Carolyn S, AU - Pak,Charles Y C, PY - 2004/8/18/pubmed PY - 2004/9/4/medline PY - 2004/8/18/entrez SP - 958 EP - 61 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 172 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: We evaluated the effect of calcium citrate supplementation alone or in combination with potassium citrate on the stone forming propensity in healthy postmenopausal women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 18 postmenopausal women without stones underwent a randomized trial of 4 phases comprised of 2 weeks of treatment with placebo, calcium citrate (400 mg calcium twice daily), potassium citrate (20 mEq twice daily), and calcium citrate and potassium citrate (at same doses). During the last 2 days of each phase urine was collected in 24-hour pools for complete stone risk analysis. RESULTS: Compared to placebo, calcium citrate increased urinary calcium and citrate but decreased urinary oxalate and phosphate. Urinary saturation of calcium oxalate, brushite and undissociated uric acid did not change. Potassium citrate decreased urinary calcium, and increased urinary citrate and pH. It decreased urinary saturation of calcium oxalate and undissociated uric acid, and did not change the saturation of brushite. When calcium citrate was combined with potassium citrate, urinary calcium remained high, urinary citrate increased even further and urinary oxalate remained reduced from the calcium citrate alone, thereby marginally decreasing the urinary saturation of calcium oxalate. Urinary pH increased, decreasing urinary undissociated uric acid. The increase in pH increased the saturation of brushite despite the decrease in urinary phosphorus. CONCLUSIONS: Calcium citrate supplementation does not increase the risk of stone formation in healthy postmenopausal women. The co-administered potassium citrate may provide additional protection against formation of uric acid and calcium oxalate stones. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15311008/Stone_forming_risk_of_calcium_citrate_supplementation_in_healthy_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/full/10.1097/01.ju.0000136400.14728.cd?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -