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Contrasting effects of manure and compost on soil pH, heavy metal availability and growth of Chenopodium album L. in a soil contaminated by pyritic mine waste.
Chemosphere 2004; 57(3):215-24C

Abstract

Chenopodium album L. was found to be one of the initial plant species colonising a heavy metal-contaminated site, polluted by pyritic (sulphide-rich) waste from the Aznalcóllar mine spill (South-western Spain). This indicates its importance in the re-vegetation of this soil. In a pot experiment, C. album was sown in soil collected from the contaminated site, either non-amended or amended with cow manure or compost produced from olive leaves and olive mill wastewater, in order to study the effect on heavy metal bioavailability and soil pH. In non-amended and compost-amended soils, soil acidification, probably resulting from oxidation and hydrolysis of sulphide, led to increases in the concentrations of soluble sulphate and plant-available Cu, Zn and Mn in the soil (extractable with 0.1 M CaCl(2)). Under these conditions, shoot growth of C. album was negligible and shoot concentrations of Zn (2,420-5,585 microg g(-1)) and Mn (5,513-8,994 microg g(-1)) were phytotoxic. Manure application greatly increased shoot growth and reduced the shoot concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mn, and their plant-available concentrations in the soil. These effects appeared to be related to an increase of soil pH, due to an inhibition of sulphide oxidation/hydrolysis, relative to the non-amended soil. For metal sulphides-contaminated soil, liable to acidification, manure application appears to be able to enhance the initial stages of re-vegetation, by species such as C. album.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Soil and Water Conservation and Organic Waste Management, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura, CSIC, Apartado 164, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15312738

Citation

Walker, David J., et al. "Contrasting Effects of Manure and Compost On Soil pH, Heavy Metal Availability and Growth of Chenopodium Album L. in a Soil Contaminated By Pyritic Mine Waste." Chemosphere, vol. 57, no. 3, 2004, pp. 215-24.
Walker DJ, Clemente R, Bernal MP. Contrasting effects of manure and compost on soil pH, heavy metal availability and growth of Chenopodium album L. in a soil contaminated by pyritic mine waste. Chemosphere. 2004;57(3):215-24.
Walker, D. J., Clemente, R., & Bernal, M. P. (2004). Contrasting effects of manure and compost on soil pH, heavy metal availability and growth of Chenopodium album L. in a soil contaminated by pyritic mine waste. Chemosphere, 57(3), pp. 215-24.
Walker DJ, Clemente R, Bernal MP. Contrasting Effects of Manure and Compost On Soil pH, Heavy Metal Availability and Growth of Chenopodium Album L. in a Soil Contaminated By Pyritic Mine Waste. Chemosphere. 2004;57(3):215-24. PubMed PMID: 15312738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contrasting effects of manure and compost on soil pH, heavy metal availability and growth of Chenopodium album L. in a soil contaminated by pyritic mine waste. AU - Walker,David J, AU - Clemente,Rafael, AU - Bernal,M Pilar, PY - 2003/09/12/received PY - 2004/05/06/revised PY - 2004/05/19/accepted PY - 2004/8/18/pubmed PY - 2004/11/2/medline PY - 2004/8/18/entrez SP - 215 EP - 24 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 57 IS - 3 N2 - Chenopodium album L. was found to be one of the initial plant species colonising a heavy metal-contaminated site, polluted by pyritic (sulphide-rich) waste from the Aznalcóllar mine spill (South-western Spain). This indicates its importance in the re-vegetation of this soil. In a pot experiment, C. album was sown in soil collected from the contaminated site, either non-amended or amended with cow manure or compost produced from olive leaves and olive mill wastewater, in order to study the effect on heavy metal bioavailability and soil pH. In non-amended and compost-amended soils, soil acidification, probably resulting from oxidation and hydrolysis of sulphide, led to increases in the concentrations of soluble sulphate and plant-available Cu, Zn and Mn in the soil (extractable with 0.1 M CaCl(2)). Under these conditions, shoot growth of C. album was negligible and shoot concentrations of Zn (2,420-5,585 microg g(-1)) and Mn (5,513-8,994 microg g(-1)) were phytotoxic. Manure application greatly increased shoot growth and reduced the shoot concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mn, and their plant-available concentrations in the soil. These effects appeared to be related to an increase of soil pH, due to an inhibition of sulphide oxidation/hydrolysis, relative to the non-amended soil. For metal sulphides-contaminated soil, liable to acidification, manure application appears to be able to enhance the initial stages of re-vegetation, by species such as C. album. SN - 0045-6535 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15312738/Contrasting_effects_of_manure_and_compost_on_soil_pH_heavy_metal_availability_and_growth_of_Chenopodium_album_L__in_a_soil_contaminated_by_pyritic_mine_waste_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(04)00407-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -