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Unusual anaerobic bacteria in keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis: diagnosis using molecular biology methods.
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2004 Aug; 30(8):1790-4.JC

Abstract

Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) was performed in the left eye of a 57-year-old man for residual ametropia after phacoemulsification. The patient was given topical tobramycin and a corticosteroid for 1 week postoperatively. Fifteen days later, he developed 3 corneal infiltrates beneath the flap with a gas bubble, suggesting an anaerobic infection. Tobramycin and ofloxacin were administered every 2 hours, but the condition worsened. Corneal scrapings were taken from beneath the flap for microbiological cultures and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The PCR amplification was negative for fungi and mycobacteria and positive for bacterial DNA. Sequence analysis showed Propionibacterium granulosum as the causal agent, but cultures were negative. Treatment with vancomycin and cefazolin led to clinical improvement, with resolution of corneal infiltrates. Anaerobic microorganisms can cause keratitis after LASIK. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA typing can help detect microorganisms involved in these ocular infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departmento Biología Molecular, Instituto Oftalmológico de Alicante, Avenida de Denia no 111, 03015 Alicante, Spain. cferrer@oftalio.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15313309

Citation

Ferrer, Consuelo, et al. "Unusual Anaerobic Bacteria in Keratitis After Laser in Situ Keratomileusis: Diagnosis Using Molecular Biology Methods." Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, vol. 30, no. 8, 2004, pp. 1790-4.
Ferrer C, Rodríguez-Prats JL, Abad JL, et al. Unusual anaerobic bacteria in keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis: diagnosis using molecular biology methods. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2004;30(8):1790-4.
Ferrer, C., Rodríguez-Prats, J. L., Abad, J. L., & Alió, J. L. (2004). Unusual anaerobic bacteria in keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis: diagnosis using molecular biology methods. Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, 30(8), 1790-4.
Ferrer C, et al. Unusual Anaerobic Bacteria in Keratitis After Laser in Situ Keratomileusis: Diagnosis Using Molecular Biology Methods. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2004;30(8):1790-4. PubMed PMID: 15313309.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unusual anaerobic bacteria in keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis: diagnosis using molecular biology methods. AU - Ferrer,Consuelo, AU - Rodríguez-Prats,Jose L, AU - Abad,José L, AU - Alió,Jorge L, PY - 2003/11/07/accepted PY - 2004/8/18/pubmed PY - 2004/10/8/medline PY - 2004/8/18/entrez SP - 1790 EP - 4 JF - Journal of cataract and refractive surgery JO - J Cataract Refract Surg VL - 30 IS - 8 N2 - Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) was performed in the left eye of a 57-year-old man for residual ametropia after phacoemulsification. The patient was given topical tobramycin and a corticosteroid for 1 week postoperatively. Fifteen days later, he developed 3 corneal infiltrates beneath the flap with a gas bubble, suggesting an anaerobic infection. Tobramycin and ofloxacin were administered every 2 hours, but the condition worsened. Corneal scrapings were taken from beneath the flap for microbiological cultures and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The PCR amplification was negative for fungi and mycobacteria and positive for bacterial DNA. Sequence analysis showed Propionibacterium granulosum as the causal agent, but cultures were negative. Treatment with vancomycin and cefazolin led to clinical improvement, with resolution of corneal infiltrates. Anaerobic microorganisms can cause keratitis after LASIK. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA typing can help detect microorganisms involved in these ocular infections. SN - 0886-3350 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15313309/Unusual_anaerobic_bacteria_in_keratitis_after_laser_in_situ_keratomileusis:_diagnosis_using_molecular_biology_methods_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0886335004000173 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -