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Prematurity, maternal stress and mother-child interactions.
Early Hum Dev. 2004 Sep; 79(2):145-58.EH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies have shown that premature birth and the immaturity of the child can affect the quality of the parent-child relationship. The present study examines the relationship between maternal and infant interactional behavior over time and infant perinatal risk factors as well as maternal perinatal recollected traumatic experience. Few studies have explored the relationship between maternal stress and the quality of parent-infant interaction.

DESIGN

Mother-child interaction was recorded at 6 and 18 months of infant's age, in a population of 47 preterm infants (GA<34 weeks) and 25 full-term infants, born in 1998, during a play interaction. According to the Care Index, sensitivity, control and unresponsiveness have been used to code maternal interactional characteristics, and cooperation, compliance-compulsiveness, difficulty and passivity have been used to code the infant's interactional characteristics. The level of maternal stress was evaluated with the Perinatal Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Questionnaire (PPQ), and the infant's perinatal risk factors were assessed with the Perinatal Risk Inventory (PERI).

RESULTS

Mothers of high-risk infants, as well as mothers that had experienced traumatic stress in the perinatal period, were less sensitive and more controlling at 6 months. The interactional behavior of the preterm infant was different from that of the full-term infant at 18 months of age, and was correlated with maternal traumatic stress but not with perinatal risk factors.

CONCLUSION

These results underline the importance of maternal traumatic experience related to premature birth and its potential long lasting influence on mother-child interactional behavior.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital Lausanne, Avenue Pierre-Decker 5, Lausanne 1011, Switzerland. Carole.Muller-Nix@inst.hospvd.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15324994

Citation

Muller-Nix, Carole, et al. "Prematurity, Maternal Stress and Mother-child Interactions." Early Human Development, vol. 79, no. 2, 2004, pp. 145-58.
Muller-Nix C, Forcada-Guex M, Pierrehumbert B, et al. Prematurity, maternal stress and mother-child interactions. Early Hum Dev. 2004;79(2):145-58.
Muller-Nix, C., Forcada-Guex, M., Pierrehumbert, B., Jaunin, L., Borghini, A., & Ansermet, F. (2004). Prematurity, maternal stress and mother-child interactions. Early Human Development, 79(2), 145-58.
Muller-Nix C, et al. Prematurity, Maternal Stress and Mother-child Interactions. Early Hum Dev. 2004;79(2):145-58. PubMed PMID: 15324994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prematurity, maternal stress and mother-child interactions. AU - Muller-Nix,Carole, AU - Forcada-Guex,Margarita, AU - Pierrehumbert,Blaise, AU - Jaunin,Lyne, AU - Borghini,Ayala, AU - Ansermet,François, PY - 2004/05/10/accepted PY - 2004/8/25/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/8/25/entrez SP - 145 EP - 58 JF - Early human development JO - Early Hum. Dev. VL - 79 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have shown that premature birth and the immaturity of the child can affect the quality of the parent-child relationship. The present study examines the relationship between maternal and infant interactional behavior over time and infant perinatal risk factors as well as maternal perinatal recollected traumatic experience. Few studies have explored the relationship between maternal stress and the quality of parent-infant interaction. DESIGN: Mother-child interaction was recorded at 6 and 18 months of infant's age, in a population of 47 preterm infants (GA<34 weeks) and 25 full-term infants, born in 1998, during a play interaction. According to the Care Index, sensitivity, control and unresponsiveness have been used to code maternal interactional characteristics, and cooperation, compliance-compulsiveness, difficulty and passivity have been used to code the infant's interactional characteristics. The level of maternal stress was evaluated with the Perinatal Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Questionnaire (PPQ), and the infant's perinatal risk factors were assessed with the Perinatal Risk Inventory (PERI). RESULTS: Mothers of high-risk infants, as well as mothers that had experienced traumatic stress in the perinatal period, were less sensitive and more controlling at 6 months. The interactional behavior of the preterm infant was different from that of the full-term infant at 18 months of age, and was correlated with maternal traumatic stress but not with perinatal risk factors. CONCLUSION: These results underline the importance of maternal traumatic experience related to premature birth and its potential long lasting influence on mother-child interactional behavior. SN - 0378-3782 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15324994/Prematurity_maternal_stress_and_mother_child_interactions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-3782(04)00077-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -