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Fruit and vegetable consumption is inversely associated with blood pressure in a Mediterranean population with a high vegetable-fat intake: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Study.
Br J Nutr 2004; 92(2):311-9BJ

Abstract

There is evidence that a diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces blood pressure (BP). Characteristically, the Mediterranean diet is rich in plant-derived foods and also in fat, but studies conducted in Mediterranean countries to relate diet to BP are scarce. We studied the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and BP in a cross-sectional analysis of 4393 participants in the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Study, an ongoing dynamic cohort study in Spain. Diet was measured using a food-frequency questionnaire previously validated in Spain. Fat represented more than 37 % total energy intake. Subjects were considered to have undiagnosed hypertension if they reported systolic BP > or = 140 mmHg or diastolic BP > or = 90 mmHg, and not a medical diagnosis of hypertension. The adjusted prevalence odds ratio of undiagnosed hypertension (upper v. lowest quintile) was 0.58 (95 % CI 0.36, 0.91; P for trend 0.01) for vegetable consumption and 0.68 (95 % CI 0.43, 1.09; P for trend 0.10) for fruit consumption. Comparing those in the highest quintile of both fruit and vegetable consumption with those in the lowest quintile of both food groups, the prevalence odds ratio was 0.23 (95 % CI 0.10, 0.55; P = 0.001), after adjusting for risk factors for hypertension and other dietary exposures. In a Mediterranean population with an elevated fat consumption, a high fruit and vegetable intake is inversely associated with BP levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15333163

Citation

Alonso, Alvaro, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Is Inversely Associated With Blood Pressure in a Mediterranean Population With a High Vegetable-fat Intake: the Seguimiento Universidad De Navarra (SUN) Study." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 92, no. 2, 2004, pp. 311-9.
Alonso A, de la Fuente C, Martín-Arnau AM, et al. Fruit and vegetable consumption is inversely associated with blood pressure in a Mediterranean population with a high vegetable-fat intake: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Study. Br J Nutr. 2004;92(2):311-9.
Alonso, A., de la Fuente, C., Martín-Arnau, A. M., de Irala, J., Martínez, J. A., & Martínez-González, M. A. (2004). Fruit and vegetable consumption is inversely associated with blood pressure in a Mediterranean population with a high vegetable-fat intake: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Study. The British Journal of Nutrition, 92(2), pp. 311-9.
Alonso A, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Is Inversely Associated With Blood Pressure in a Mediterranean Population With a High Vegetable-fat Intake: the Seguimiento Universidad De Navarra (SUN) Study. Br J Nutr. 2004;92(2):311-9. PubMed PMID: 15333163.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable consumption is inversely associated with blood pressure in a Mediterranean population with a high vegetable-fat intake: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Study. AU - Alonso,Alvaro, AU - de la Fuente,Carmen, AU - Martín-Arnau,Ana M, AU - de Irala,Jokin, AU - Martínez,J Alfredo, AU - Martínez-González,Miguel Angel, PY - 2004/8/31/pubmed PY - 2004/9/28/medline PY - 2004/8/31/entrez SP - 311 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 92 IS - 2 N2 - There is evidence that a diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces blood pressure (BP). Characteristically, the Mediterranean diet is rich in plant-derived foods and also in fat, but studies conducted in Mediterranean countries to relate diet to BP are scarce. We studied the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and BP in a cross-sectional analysis of 4393 participants in the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Study, an ongoing dynamic cohort study in Spain. Diet was measured using a food-frequency questionnaire previously validated in Spain. Fat represented more than 37 % total energy intake. Subjects were considered to have undiagnosed hypertension if they reported systolic BP > or = 140 mmHg or diastolic BP > or = 90 mmHg, and not a medical diagnosis of hypertension. The adjusted prevalence odds ratio of undiagnosed hypertension (upper v. lowest quintile) was 0.58 (95 % CI 0.36, 0.91; P for trend 0.01) for vegetable consumption and 0.68 (95 % CI 0.43, 1.09; P for trend 0.10) for fruit consumption. Comparing those in the highest quintile of both fruit and vegetable consumption with those in the lowest quintile of both food groups, the prevalence odds ratio was 0.23 (95 % CI 0.10, 0.55; P = 0.001), after adjusting for risk factors for hypertension and other dietary exposures. In a Mediterranean population with an elevated fat consumption, a high fruit and vegetable intake is inversely associated with BP levels. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15333163/Fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_is_inversely_associated_with_blood_pressure_in_a_Mediterranean_population_with_a_high_vegetable_fat_intake:_the_Seguimiento_Universidad_de_Navarra__SUN__Study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114504001631/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -