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Incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes attributable to atypical antipsychotic medications.
Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Sep; 161(9):1709-11.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the study was to determine the proportion of patients with schizophrenia with a stable regimen of antipsychotic monotherapy who developed diabetes or were hospitalized for ketoacidosis.

METHOD

Patients with schizophrenia for whom a stable regimen of antipsychotic monotherapy was consistently prescribed during any 3-month period between June 1999 and September 2000 and who had no diabetes were followed through September 2001 by using administrative data from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Cox proportional hazards models were developed to identify the characteristics associated with newly diagnosed diabetes and ketoacidosis.

RESULTS

Of the 56,849 patients identified, 4,132 (7.3%) developed diabetes and 88 (0.2%) were hospitalized for ketoacidosis. Diabetes risk was highest for clozapine (hazard ratio=1.57) and olanzapine (hazard ratio=1.15); the diabetes risks for quetiapine (hazard ratio=1.20) and risperidone (hazard ratio=1.01) were not significantly different from that for conventional antipsychotics. The attributable risks of diabetes mellitus associated with atypical antipsychotics were small, ranging from 0.05% (risperidone) to 2.03% (clozapine).

CONCLUSIONS

Although clozapine and olanzapine have greater diabetes risk, the attributable risk of diabetes mellitus with atypical antipsychotics is small.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterans Affairs Connecticut Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center, West Haven, CT, USA. douglas.leslie@yale.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15337666

Citation

Leslie, Douglas L., and Robert A. Rosenheck. "Incidence of Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Attributable to Atypical Antipsychotic Medications." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 161, no. 9, 2004, pp. 1709-11.
Leslie DL, Rosenheck RA. Incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes attributable to atypical antipsychotic medications. Am J Psychiatry. 2004;161(9):1709-11.
Leslie, D. L., & Rosenheck, R. A. (2004). Incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes attributable to atypical antipsychotic medications. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 161(9), 1709-11.
Leslie DL, Rosenheck RA. Incidence of Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Attributable to Atypical Antipsychotic Medications. Am J Psychiatry. 2004;161(9):1709-11. PubMed PMID: 15337666.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes attributable to atypical antipsychotic medications. AU - Leslie,Douglas L, AU - Rosenheck,Robert A, PY - 2004/9/1/pubmed PY - 2004/10/8/medline PY - 2004/9/1/entrez SP - 1709 EP - 11 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 161 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to determine the proportion of patients with schizophrenia with a stable regimen of antipsychotic monotherapy who developed diabetes or were hospitalized for ketoacidosis. METHOD: Patients with schizophrenia for whom a stable regimen of antipsychotic monotherapy was consistently prescribed during any 3-month period between June 1999 and September 2000 and who had no diabetes were followed through September 2001 by using administrative data from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Cox proportional hazards models were developed to identify the characteristics associated with newly diagnosed diabetes and ketoacidosis. RESULTS: Of the 56,849 patients identified, 4,132 (7.3%) developed diabetes and 88 (0.2%) were hospitalized for ketoacidosis. Diabetes risk was highest for clozapine (hazard ratio=1.57) and olanzapine (hazard ratio=1.15); the diabetes risks for quetiapine (hazard ratio=1.20) and risperidone (hazard ratio=1.01) were not significantly different from that for conventional antipsychotics. The attributable risks of diabetes mellitus associated with atypical antipsychotics were small, ranging from 0.05% (risperidone) to 2.03% (clozapine). CONCLUSIONS: Although clozapine and olanzapine have greater diabetes risk, the attributable risk of diabetes mellitus with atypical antipsychotics is small. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15337666/Incidence_of_newly_diagnosed_diabetes_attributable_to_atypical_antipsychotic_medications_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.161.9.1709?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -