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Relationship between body mass index, diet, exercise and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a community.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for gastro-oesophageal reflux but may simply be explained by diet and lifestyle.

AIM

We aimed to determine the contribution of BMI, diet and exercise to GER.

METHODS

Community subjects (n = 211, mean age = 36 years, 43% males) completed validated questionnaires on gastro-oesophageal reflux, energy expenditure (Harvard Alumni Activity Survey), dietary intake (Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire) and measures of personality and life event stress. Diet, exercise, BMI and other potential risk factors for reflux were analysed using logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS

The overall mean (+/- s.d.) BMI was 26.6 (+/- 5.7); 79 (37%) reported infrequent (< weekly) reflux and 16 (8%) reported frequent (> or = weekly) reflux. The median caloric intake was 2097 cal/day and the median daily energy expenditure was 1753 cal/day. Among those with BMI > 25, 10% reported frequent reflux compared to 4% of those with BMI < or = 25. In a model which included age, sex and Symptom Checklist-90 somatisation T-score, BMI was associated with reflux (OR per 5 units = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.0). In models which included diet and exercise variables, BMI but not diet or exercise was associated with reflux.

CONCLUSION

BMI may be associated with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux independent of diet and exercise.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Gastroenterology, Center for Enteric Neurosciences and Translational Epidemiological Research (CENTER) and Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics 20:5 2004 Sep 01 pg 497-505

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Mass Index
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet
    Exercise
    Female
    Gastroesophageal Reflux
    Humans
    Male
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15339321

    Citation

    Nandurkar, S, et al. "Relationship Between Body Mass Index, Diet, Exercise and Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Symptoms in a Community." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 20, no. 5, 2004, pp. 497-505.
    Nandurkar S, Locke GR, Fett S, et al. Relationship between body mass index, diet, exercise and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a community. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004;20(5):497-505.
    Nandurkar, S., Locke, G. R., Fett, S., Zinsmeister, A. R., Cameron, A. J., & Talley, N. J. (2004). Relationship between body mass index, diet, exercise and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a community. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 20(5), pp. 497-505.
    Nandurkar S, et al. Relationship Between Body Mass Index, Diet, Exercise and Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Symptoms in a Community. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Sep 1;20(5):497-505. PubMed PMID: 15339321.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between body mass index, diet, exercise and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in a community. AU - Nandurkar,S, AU - Locke,G R,3rd AU - Fett,S, AU - Zinsmeister,A R, AU - Cameron,A J, AU - Talley,N J, PY - 2004/9/2/pubmed PY - 2004/12/18/medline PY - 2004/9/2/entrez SP - 497 EP - 505 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for gastro-oesophageal reflux but may simply be explained by diet and lifestyle. AIM: We aimed to determine the contribution of BMI, diet and exercise to GER. METHODS: Community subjects (n = 211, mean age = 36 years, 43% males) completed validated questionnaires on gastro-oesophageal reflux, energy expenditure (Harvard Alumni Activity Survey), dietary intake (Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire) and measures of personality and life event stress. Diet, exercise, BMI and other potential risk factors for reflux were analysed using logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The overall mean (+/- s.d.) BMI was 26.6 (+/- 5.7); 79 (37%) reported infrequent (< weekly) reflux and 16 (8%) reported frequent (> or = weekly) reflux. The median caloric intake was 2097 cal/day and the median daily energy expenditure was 1753 cal/day. Among those with BMI > 25, 10% reported frequent reflux compared to 4% of those with BMI < or = 25. In a model which included age, sex and Symptom Checklist-90 somatisation T-score, BMI was associated with reflux (OR per 5 units = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.0). In models which included diet and exercise variables, BMI but not diet or exercise was associated with reflux. CONCLUSION: BMI may be associated with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux independent of diet and exercise. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15339321/Relationship_between_body_mass_index_diet_exercise_and_gastro_oesophageal_reflux_symptoms_in_a_community_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2004.02156.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -