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Long-term prediction of incident hip fracture risk in elderly white women: study of osteoporotic fractures.
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Sep; 52(9):1479-86.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To identify independent risk factors for first hip fracture over 10 years of follow-up.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Four U.S. clinical centers.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 6,787 women aged 66 and older in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures.

MEASUREMENTS

Total hip bone mineral density (BMD) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and a comprehensive set of potential risk factors were collected. Incident hip fractures were identified prospectively and confirmed using radiographic report.

RESULTS

Six hundred two women (8.9%) had a hip fracture during a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) follow-up of 10.1 +/- 3.2 years. Older age, previous self-reported fracture after age 50, maternal history of hip fracture after age 50, greater height at age 25, impaired cognition, slower walking speed, nulliparity, type II diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, and depth perception each independently predicted a 1.17- to 1.83-fold increase in hip fracture risk, whereas each SD (0.13 g/cm2) decrease in hip BMD was independently associated with a 1.84-fold increase in risk. Lower body mass index also was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, although lower hip BMD largely explained this association.

CONCLUSION

Although hip BMD is strongly related to hip fracture risk in elderly white women, other clinical risk factors also are independent predictors of long-term risk and provide additional insight into the prevention of fracture in high-risk women. Clinicians should be alert to factors other than BMD that place older women at a high risk of hip fracture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15341549

Citation

Taylor, Brent C., et al. "Long-term Prediction of Incident Hip Fracture Risk in Elderly White Women: Study of Osteoporotic Fractures." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 52, no. 9, 2004, pp. 1479-86.
Taylor BC, Schreiner PJ, Stone KL, et al. Long-term prediction of incident hip fracture risk in elderly white women: study of osteoporotic fractures. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004;52(9):1479-86.
Taylor, B. C., Schreiner, P. J., Stone, K. L., Fink, H. A., Cummings, S. R., Nevitt, M. C., Bowman, P. J., & Ensrud, K. E. (2004). Long-term prediction of incident hip fracture risk in elderly white women: study of osteoporotic fractures. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 52(9), 1479-86.
Taylor BC, et al. Long-term Prediction of Incident Hip Fracture Risk in Elderly White Women: Study of Osteoporotic Fractures. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004;52(9):1479-86. PubMed PMID: 15341549.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term prediction of incident hip fracture risk in elderly white women: study of osteoporotic fractures. AU - Taylor,Brent C, AU - Schreiner,Pamela J, AU - Stone,Katie L, AU - Fink,Howard A, AU - Cummings,Steven R, AU - Nevitt,Michael C, AU - Bowman,Paula J, AU - Ensrud,Kristine E, PY - 2004/9/3/pubmed PY - 2004/10/8/medline PY - 2004/9/3/entrez SP - 1479 EP - 86 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 52 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To identify independent risk factors for first hip fracture over 10 years of follow-up. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four U.S. clinical centers. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 6,787 women aged 66 and older in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures. MEASUREMENTS: Total hip bone mineral density (BMD) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and a comprehensive set of potential risk factors were collected. Incident hip fractures were identified prospectively and confirmed using radiographic report. RESULTS: Six hundred two women (8.9%) had a hip fracture during a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) follow-up of 10.1 +/- 3.2 years. Older age, previous self-reported fracture after age 50, maternal history of hip fracture after age 50, greater height at age 25, impaired cognition, slower walking speed, nulliparity, type II diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, and depth perception each independently predicted a 1.17- to 1.83-fold increase in hip fracture risk, whereas each SD (0.13 g/cm2) decrease in hip BMD was independently associated with a 1.84-fold increase in risk. Lower body mass index also was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, although lower hip BMD largely explained this association. CONCLUSION: Although hip BMD is strongly related to hip fracture risk in elderly white women, other clinical risk factors also are independent predictors of long-term risk and provide additional insight into the prevention of fracture in high-risk women. Clinicians should be alert to factors other than BMD that place older women at a high risk of hip fracture. SN - 0002-8614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15341549/Long_term_prediction_of_incident_hip_fracture_risk_in_elderly_white_women:_study_of_osteoporotic_fractures_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0002-8614&date=2004&volume=52&issue=9&spage=1479 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -