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The pathway to dentistry for minority students: from their perspective.
J Dent Educ. 2004 Sep; 68(9):938-46.JD

Abstract

The small number of minorities in the field of dentistry is a serious concern. While the United States as a whole has become more diverse with minorities making up 25 percent of the total U.S. population, only a handful (14 percent) are currently practicing dentistry, and only 11 percent entering dental schools are underrepresented minorities. Pipeline, Profession, & Practice: Community-Based Dental Education is a national foundation-sponsored program designed to address this issue in dental education. To understand the reasons why dentistry attracts so few underrepresented minority (URM) students, we conducted focus groups and in-depth interviews to determine the challenges facing minority students when they apply to and attend dental school. Ten focus groups were conducted with a total of ninety-two minority students (fourteen undergraduate students and seventy-eight students currently enrolled in dental schools) at six universities in four geographic regions. In addition, four in-depth interviews were held with faculty advisors who teach, mentor, and recruit minority students. The major findings of the study are as follows: 1) early and frequent exposure to dentistry and dentists in practice is essential for minority students to consider this profession; 2) while many dental schools have earnestly tried to recruit minority applicants, most URM students find out about dental programs by a family member or friend and not as a result of an intentional recruiting effort; and 3) hearing directly from minority students could be a solid first step in understanding the dental school experience from a different vantage point. This study has important implications for the methods dental schools use to both recruit minority students and foster a learning environment that is sensitive to students from diverse backgrounds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Columbia University Center for Community Health Partnerships, 630 W. 168th Street, P& S Box 100, New York, NY 10032, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15342654

Citation

Veal, Keith, et al. "The Pathway to Dentistry for Minority Students: From Their Perspective." Journal of Dental Education, vol. 68, no. 9, 2004, pp. 938-46.
Veal K, Perry M, Stavisky J, et al. The pathway to dentistry for minority students: from their perspective. J Dent Educ. 2004;68(9):938-46.
Veal, K., Perry, M., Stavisky, J., & Herbert, K. D. (2004). The pathway to dentistry for minority students: from their perspective. Journal of Dental Education, 68(9), 938-46.
Veal K, et al. The Pathway to Dentistry for Minority Students: From Their Perspective. J Dent Educ. 2004;68(9):938-46. PubMed PMID: 15342654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The pathway to dentistry for minority students: from their perspective. AU - Veal,Keith, AU - Perry,Michael, AU - Stavisky,Judith, AU - Herbert,Kim D'Abreu, PY - 2004/9/3/pubmed PY - 2004/10/8/medline PY - 2004/9/3/entrez SP - 938 EP - 46 JF - Journal of dental education JO - J Dent Educ VL - 68 IS - 9 N2 - The small number of minorities in the field of dentistry is a serious concern. While the United States as a whole has become more diverse with minorities making up 25 percent of the total U.S. population, only a handful (14 percent) are currently practicing dentistry, and only 11 percent entering dental schools are underrepresented minorities. Pipeline, Profession, & Practice: Community-Based Dental Education is a national foundation-sponsored program designed to address this issue in dental education. To understand the reasons why dentistry attracts so few underrepresented minority (URM) students, we conducted focus groups and in-depth interviews to determine the challenges facing minority students when they apply to and attend dental school. Ten focus groups were conducted with a total of ninety-two minority students (fourteen undergraduate students and seventy-eight students currently enrolled in dental schools) at six universities in four geographic regions. In addition, four in-depth interviews were held with faculty advisors who teach, mentor, and recruit minority students. The major findings of the study are as follows: 1) early and frequent exposure to dentistry and dentists in practice is essential for minority students to consider this profession; 2) while many dental schools have earnestly tried to recruit minority applicants, most URM students find out about dental programs by a family member or friend and not as a result of an intentional recruiting effort; and 3) hearing directly from minority students could be a solid first step in understanding the dental school experience from a different vantage point. This study has important implications for the methods dental schools use to both recruit minority students and foster a learning environment that is sensitive to students from diverse backgrounds. SN - 0022-0337 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15342654/The_pathway_to_dentistry_for_minority_students:_from_their_perspective_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0022-0337&date=2004&volume=68&issue=9&spage=938 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -