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Mode of delivery is not associated with asthma or atopy in childhood.
Clin Exp Allergy. 2004 Sep; 34(9):1349-55.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Caesarean-section delivery has been associated with the subsequent development of atopy and wheezing in childhood.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between mode of delivery (vaginal vs. caesarean section) and development of atopy, asthma and wheezing disorders in a population-based cohort of children.

METHODS

The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children is a longitudinal birth cohort of children born 1 April 1991 to 31 December 1992. Mode of delivery was categorized as vaginal (including forceps and ventouse extractions) or caesarean section (elective and emergency). Primary outcomes were parental report of asthma or wheezing between 69 and 81 months of age, physician-diagnosed asthma (PDA) at 91 months of age and atopy at 7 years by skin prick testing. Possible confounding factors were considered in a multivariable logistic regression model.

RESULTS

Total livebirths were 14,062, from which were selected 12 367 born to mothers resident in a defined area and delivered in one of two major obstetric hospitals. Of these infants, 10,980 (88.8%) were delivered vaginally and 1387 (11.2%) by caesarean section. Outcome data were available for 7495 (61%) subjects (asthma 69-81 months); 7389 (60%) (wheeze 69-81 months); 7196 (58%) (PDA 91 months) and 5916 (48%) (atopy 7 years). Adjusted odds ratios [95%confidence interval] for caesarean section compared with vaginal delivery were not statistically significant for any outcome we considered: asthma 69-81 months 1.16 [0.9, 1.5]; wheeze 69-81 months 0.95 [0.7, 1.3]; PDA 1.14 [0.9, 1.4]; atopy 1.04 [0.8, 1.3].

CONCLUSION

Delivery by caesarean section was not associated with the subsequent development of asthma, wheezing or atopy in later childhood in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol, UK. dramaitra@yahoo.co.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15347366

Citation

Maitra, A, et al. "Mode of Delivery Is Not Associated With Asthma or Atopy in Childhood." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 34, no. 9, 2004, pp. 1349-55.
Maitra A, Sherriff A, Strachan D, et al. Mode of delivery is not associated with asthma or atopy in childhood. Clin Exp Allergy. 2004;34(9):1349-55.
Maitra, A., Sherriff, A., Strachan, D., & Henderson, J. (2004). Mode of delivery is not associated with asthma or atopy in childhood. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 34(9), 1349-55.
Maitra A, et al. Mode of Delivery Is Not Associated With Asthma or Atopy in Childhood. Clin Exp Allergy. 2004;34(9):1349-55. PubMed PMID: 15347366.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mode of delivery is not associated with asthma or atopy in childhood. AU - Maitra,A, AU - Sherriff,A, AU - Strachan,D, AU - Henderson,J, AU - ,, PY - 2004/9/7/pubmed PY - 2005/2/8/medline PY - 2004/9/7/entrez SP - 1349 EP - 55 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin Exp Allergy VL - 34 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Caesarean-section delivery has been associated with the subsequent development of atopy and wheezing in childhood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between mode of delivery (vaginal vs. caesarean section) and development of atopy, asthma and wheezing disorders in a population-based cohort of children. METHODS: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children is a longitudinal birth cohort of children born 1 April 1991 to 31 December 1992. Mode of delivery was categorized as vaginal (including forceps and ventouse extractions) or caesarean section (elective and emergency). Primary outcomes were parental report of asthma or wheezing between 69 and 81 months of age, physician-diagnosed asthma (PDA) at 91 months of age and atopy at 7 years by skin prick testing. Possible confounding factors were considered in a multivariable logistic regression model. RESULTS: Total livebirths were 14,062, from which were selected 12 367 born to mothers resident in a defined area and delivered in one of two major obstetric hospitals. Of these infants, 10,980 (88.8%) were delivered vaginally and 1387 (11.2%) by caesarean section. Outcome data were available for 7495 (61%) subjects (asthma 69-81 months); 7389 (60%) (wheeze 69-81 months); 7196 (58%) (PDA 91 months) and 5916 (48%) (atopy 7 years). Adjusted odds ratios [95%confidence interval] for caesarean section compared with vaginal delivery were not statistically significant for any outcome we considered: asthma 69-81 months 1.16 [0.9, 1.5]; wheeze 69-81 months 0.95 [0.7, 1.3]; PDA 1.14 [0.9, 1.4]; atopy 1.04 [0.8, 1.3]. CONCLUSION: Delivery by caesarean section was not associated with the subsequent development of asthma, wheezing or atopy in later childhood in this population. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15347366/Mode_of_delivery_is_not_associated_with_asthma_or_atopy_in_childhood_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0954-7894&date=2004&volume=34&issue=9&spage=1349 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -