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Characterising the central mechanisms of sensory modulation in human swallowing motor cortex.
Clin Neurophysiol. 2004 Oct; 115(10):2382-90.CN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Pharyngeal stimulation can induce remarkable increases in the excitability of swallowing motor cortex, which is associated with short-term improvements in swallowing behaviour in dysphagic stroke patients. However, the mechanism by which this input induces cortical change remains unclear. Our aims were to explore the stimulus-induced facilitation of the cortico-bulbar projections to swallowing musculature and examine how input from the pharynx interacts with swallowing motor cortex.

METHODS

In 8 healthy subjects, a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paired-pulse investigation was performed comprising a single conditioning electrical pharyngeal stimulus (pulse width 0.2 ms, 240 V) followed by cortical TMS at inter-stimulus intervals (ISI) of 10-100 ms. Pharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEP) were also measured over the vertex. In 6 subjects whole-brain magnetoencephalography (MEG) was further acquired following pharyngeal stimulation.

RESULTS

TMS evoked pharyngeal motor evoked potentials were facilitated by the pharyngeal stimulus at ISI between 50 and 80 ms (Delta mean increase: 47+/-6%, P < 0.05). This correlated with the peak latency of the P1 component of the PSEP (mean 79.6+/-8.5 ms). MEG confirmed that the equivalent P1 peak activities were localised to caudolateral sensory and motor cortices (BA 4, 1, 2).

CONCLUSIONS

Facilitation of the cortico-bulbar pathway to pharyngeal stimulation relates to coincident afferent input to sensorimotor cortex.

SIGNIFICANCE

These findings have mechanistic importance on how pharyngeal stimulation may increase motor excitability and provide guidance on temporal windows for future manipulations of swallowing motor cortex.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of GI Sciences, University of Manchester, Clinical Sciences Building, Hope Hospital, Eccles Old Road, Salford M6 8HD, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15351381

Citation

Gow, David, et al. "Characterising the Central Mechanisms of Sensory Modulation in Human Swallowing Motor Cortex." Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 115, no. 10, 2004, pp. 2382-90.
Gow D, Hobson AR, Furlong P, et al. Characterising the central mechanisms of sensory modulation in human swallowing motor cortex. Clin Neurophysiol. 2004;115(10):2382-90.
Gow, D., Hobson, A. R., Furlong, P., & Hamdy, S. (2004). Characterising the central mechanisms of sensory modulation in human swallowing motor cortex. Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, 115(10), 2382-90.
Gow D, et al. Characterising the Central Mechanisms of Sensory Modulation in Human Swallowing Motor Cortex. Clin Neurophysiol. 2004;115(10):2382-90. PubMed PMID: 15351381.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Characterising the central mechanisms of sensory modulation in human swallowing motor cortex. AU - Gow,David, AU - Hobson,Anthony R, AU - Furlong,Paul, AU - Hamdy,Shaheen, PY - 2004/05/06/accepted PY - 2004/9/8/pubmed PY - 2004/10/27/medline PY - 2004/9/8/entrez SP - 2382 EP - 90 JF - Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology JO - Clin Neurophysiol VL - 115 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Pharyngeal stimulation can induce remarkable increases in the excitability of swallowing motor cortex, which is associated with short-term improvements in swallowing behaviour in dysphagic stroke patients. However, the mechanism by which this input induces cortical change remains unclear. Our aims were to explore the stimulus-induced facilitation of the cortico-bulbar projections to swallowing musculature and examine how input from the pharynx interacts with swallowing motor cortex. METHODS: In 8 healthy subjects, a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paired-pulse investigation was performed comprising a single conditioning electrical pharyngeal stimulus (pulse width 0.2 ms, 240 V) followed by cortical TMS at inter-stimulus intervals (ISI) of 10-100 ms. Pharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEP) were also measured over the vertex. In 6 subjects whole-brain magnetoencephalography (MEG) was further acquired following pharyngeal stimulation. RESULTS: TMS evoked pharyngeal motor evoked potentials were facilitated by the pharyngeal stimulus at ISI between 50 and 80 ms (Delta mean increase: 47+/-6%, P < 0.05). This correlated with the peak latency of the P1 component of the PSEP (mean 79.6+/-8.5 ms). MEG confirmed that the equivalent P1 peak activities were localised to caudolateral sensory and motor cortices (BA 4, 1, 2). CONCLUSIONS: Facilitation of the cortico-bulbar pathway to pharyngeal stimulation relates to coincident afferent input to sensorimotor cortex. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings have mechanistic importance on how pharyngeal stimulation may increase motor excitability and provide guidance on temporal windows for future manipulations of swallowing motor cortex. SN - 1388-2457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15351381/Characterising_the_central_mechanisms_of_sensory_modulation_in_human_swallowing_motor_cortex_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1388245704001956 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -