Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Genetic and environmental contributions to the development of alcohol dependence in male twins.
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004 Sep; 61(9):897-903.AG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Information on the heritability of the development of alcohol dependence could provide a better understanding of the importance of genetic components in disease transition.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the genetic and nongenetic contributions to the age at onset of regular alcohol use, the age at diagnosis of alcohol dependence, and the transition from regular alcohol use to alcohol dependence.

DESIGN

Classic twin study.

SETTING

General community.

PARTICIPANTS

This study included 3372 twin pairs of known zygosity from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. The diagnosis of DSM-III-R-defined alcohol dependence and related information were obtained through telephone-administered interviews conducted in 1992.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Standardized proportions due to genetic vs nongenetic factors of the total variation in twin resemblance on the age at onset of regular alcohol use, the age at meeting criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence, and the transition period from regular alcohol use to a diagnosis of alcohol dependence.

RESULTS

Genetic influence accounted for 49% of the variation in the age at diagnosis of alcohol dependence. After adjusting for co-occurring psychiatric diseases, additive genetic factors still explained more than 37% of the variance in age at onset of alcohol dependence and at least 25% of the variance in the transition period between regular drinking and the diagnosis of alcohol dependence. Additionally, after grouping participants as early and late regular users of alcohol, the genetic effects on the transition period for early regular users were statistically significantly greater than those for late regular users.

CONCLUSION

Our results demonstrate a substantial heritable basis for alcohol dependence according to its developmental sequence, including age at onset of regular use, age at diagnosis, and the transition period between regular use and diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. iliu@post.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15351768

Citation

Liu, I-Chao, et al. "Genetic and Environmental Contributions to the Development of Alcohol Dependence in Male Twins." Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 61, no. 9, 2004, pp. 897-903.
Liu IC, Blacker DL, Xu R, et al. Genetic and environmental contributions to the development of alcohol dependence in male twins. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004;61(9):897-903.
Liu, I. C., Blacker, D. L., Xu, R., Fitzmaurice, G., Lyons, M. J., & Tsuang, M. T. (2004). Genetic and environmental contributions to the development of alcohol dependence in male twins. Archives of General Psychiatry, 61(9), 897-903.
Liu IC, et al. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to the Development of Alcohol Dependence in Male Twins. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2004;61(9):897-903. PubMed PMID: 15351768.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic and environmental contributions to the development of alcohol dependence in male twins. AU - Liu,I-Chao, AU - Blacker,Deborah L, AU - Xu,Ronghui, AU - Fitzmaurice,Garrett, AU - Lyons,Michael J, AU - Tsuang,Ming T, PY - 2004/9/8/pubmed PY - 2004/9/24/medline PY - 2004/9/8/entrez SP - 897 EP - 903 JF - Archives of general psychiatry JO - Arch Gen Psychiatry VL - 61 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Information on the heritability of the development of alcohol dependence could provide a better understanding of the importance of genetic components in disease transition. OBJECTIVE: To examine the genetic and nongenetic contributions to the age at onset of regular alcohol use, the age at diagnosis of alcohol dependence, and the transition from regular alcohol use to alcohol dependence. DESIGN: Classic twin study. SETTING: General community. PARTICIPANTS: This study included 3372 twin pairs of known zygosity from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. The diagnosis of DSM-III-R-defined alcohol dependence and related information were obtained through telephone-administered interviews conducted in 1992. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Standardized proportions due to genetic vs nongenetic factors of the total variation in twin resemblance on the age at onset of regular alcohol use, the age at meeting criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence, and the transition period from regular alcohol use to a diagnosis of alcohol dependence. RESULTS: Genetic influence accounted for 49% of the variation in the age at diagnosis of alcohol dependence. After adjusting for co-occurring psychiatric diseases, additive genetic factors still explained more than 37% of the variance in age at onset of alcohol dependence and at least 25% of the variance in the transition period between regular drinking and the diagnosis of alcohol dependence. Additionally, after grouping participants as early and late regular users of alcohol, the genetic effects on the transition period for early regular users were statistically significantly greater than those for late regular users. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate a substantial heritable basis for alcohol dependence according to its developmental sequence, including age at onset of regular use, age at diagnosis, and the transition period between regular use and diagnosis. SN - 0003-990X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15351768/Genetic_and_environmental_contributions_to_the_development_of_alcohol_dependence_in_male_twins_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/10.1001/archpsyc.61.9.897 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -