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Long-term outcome and objective changes of anorectal function after biofeedback therapy for faecal incontinence.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Sep 15; 20(6):667-74.AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In the short-term, biofeedback therapy improves symptoms and anorectal function in patients with faecal incontinence but whether there is long-term improvement is incompletely understood.

AIM

To prospectively evaluate bowel symptoms and anorectal function, both immediately and 12 months after biofeedback therapy.

METHODS

A total of 105 consecutive patients (male/female = 12/93) with faecal incontinence, unresponsive to supervised medical treatment were enrolled in biofeedback training consisting of biweekly pelvic muscle strengthening exercises, anal squeeze and sensory-motor coordination training, and reinforcement sessions at 3, 6 and 12 months. Anorectal manometry, saline continence test, stool diaries and bowel satisfaction scores were used to assess improvement.

RESULTS

94/105 (male/female = 10/84) completed training and 11 dropped out. Sixty completed 1-year assessment. At 1-year, 63% reported no episodes of incontinence. Biofeedback decreased (P < 0.001) stool frequency and number of incontinence episodes and increased (P < 0.001) bowel satisfaction score, anal resting and squeeze pressures, squeeze duration and ability to retain saline infusion increased (P < 0.001), both immediately and at 1 year. Sensory thresholds decreased (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Biofeedback therapy produced sustained improvement in bowel symptoms and anorectal function. Because it is safe, inexpensive compared with other surgical interventions, and effective, biofeedback should be offered to incontinent patients unresponsive to medical therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Neurogastroenterology, Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15352915

Citation

Ozturk, R, et al. "Long-term Outcome and Objective Changes of Anorectal Function After Biofeedback Therapy for Faecal Incontinence." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 20, no. 6, 2004, pp. 667-74.
Ozturk R, Niazi S, Stessman M, et al. Long-term outcome and objective changes of anorectal function after biofeedback therapy for faecal incontinence. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004;20(6):667-74.
Ozturk, R., Niazi, S., Stessman, M., & Rao, S. S. (2004). Long-term outcome and objective changes of anorectal function after biofeedback therapy for faecal incontinence. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 20(6), 667-74.
Ozturk R, et al. Long-term Outcome and Objective Changes of Anorectal Function After Biofeedback Therapy for Faecal Incontinence. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Sep 15;20(6):667-74. PubMed PMID: 15352915.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term outcome and objective changes of anorectal function after biofeedback therapy for faecal incontinence. AU - Ozturk,R, AU - Niazi,S, AU - Stessman,M, AU - Rao,S S C, PY - 2004/9/9/pubmed PY - 2004/12/18/medline PY - 2004/9/9/entrez SP - 667 EP - 74 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment Pharmacol Ther VL - 20 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: In the short-term, biofeedback therapy improves symptoms and anorectal function in patients with faecal incontinence but whether there is long-term improvement is incompletely understood. AIM: To prospectively evaluate bowel symptoms and anorectal function, both immediately and 12 months after biofeedback therapy. METHODS: A total of 105 consecutive patients (male/female = 12/93) with faecal incontinence, unresponsive to supervised medical treatment were enrolled in biofeedback training consisting of biweekly pelvic muscle strengthening exercises, anal squeeze and sensory-motor coordination training, and reinforcement sessions at 3, 6 and 12 months. Anorectal manometry, saline continence test, stool diaries and bowel satisfaction scores were used to assess improvement. RESULTS: 94/105 (male/female = 10/84) completed training and 11 dropped out. Sixty completed 1-year assessment. At 1-year, 63% reported no episodes of incontinence. Biofeedback decreased (P < 0.001) stool frequency and number of incontinence episodes and increased (P < 0.001) bowel satisfaction score, anal resting and squeeze pressures, squeeze duration and ability to retain saline infusion increased (P < 0.001), both immediately and at 1 year. Sensory thresholds decreased (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Biofeedback therapy produced sustained improvement in bowel symptoms and anorectal function. Because it is safe, inexpensive compared with other surgical interventions, and effective, biofeedback should be offered to incontinent patients unresponsive to medical therapy. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15352915/Long_term_outcome_and_objective_changes_of_anorectal_function_after_biofeedback_therapy_for_faecal_incontinence_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2004.02125.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -