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Umbilical cord and maternal blood red cell fatty acids and early childhood wheezing and eczema.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Sep; 114(3):531-7.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies have explored whether fetal exposure to n-6 and n-3 fatty acids influences the inception of atopic disease.

OBJECTIVE

To assess prenatal fatty acid exposures as predictors of early childhood wheezing and eczema.

METHODS

In the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, late pregnancy maternal blood samples and umbilical cord blood samples were assayed for n-6 and n-3 fatty acids (percentage of total red cell phospholipid), and mothers were asked about wheezing and eczema in their children. We measured associations of 11 n-6 and n-3 fatty acid exposures with wheezing at 30 to 42 months, with wheezing patterns defined by presence (+) or absence (-) of wheezing during 2 periods, 0 to 6 months and 30 to 42 months (transient infant, +/-; later-onset, -/+; persistent, +/+; n=1191 and n=2764 for cord and maternal analyses, respectively), and with eczema at 18 to 30 months (n=1238 and n=2945 for cord and maternal analyses, respectively).

RESULTS

In cord blood red cells, the ratio of arachidonic:eicosapentaenoic acid was positively associated with eczema (adjusted odds ratio [OR] per doubling, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.31; P=.044), the ratio of linoleic acid:alpha-linolenic acid was positively associated with later-onset wheeze (OR, 1.30; CI, 1.04-1.61; P=.019), and the ratio of alpha-linolenic acid:n-3 products was negatively associated with later-onset wheeze (OR, 0.86; CI, 0.75-0.99; P=.040). However, these associations were no longer significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons.

CONCLUSIONS

It seems unlikely that fetal exposure to n-6 and n-3 fatty acids is an important determinant of early childhood wheezing and atopic disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Sciences, Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine, King's College, London, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15356553

Citation

Newson, Roger B., et al. "Umbilical Cord and Maternal Blood Red Cell Fatty Acids and Early Childhood Wheezing and Eczema." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 114, no. 3, 2004, pp. 531-7.
Newson RB, Shaheen SO, Henderson AJ, et al. Umbilical cord and maternal blood red cell fatty acids and early childhood wheezing and eczema. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004;114(3):531-7.
Newson, R. B., Shaheen, S. O., Henderson, A. J., Emmett, P. M., Sherriff, A., & Calder, P. C. (2004). Umbilical cord and maternal blood red cell fatty acids and early childhood wheezing and eczema. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 114(3), 531-7.
Newson RB, et al. Umbilical Cord and Maternal Blood Red Cell Fatty Acids and Early Childhood Wheezing and Eczema. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004;114(3):531-7. PubMed PMID: 15356553.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Umbilical cord and maternal blood red cell fatty acids and early childhood wheezing and eczema. AU - Newson,Roger B, AU - Shaheen,Seif O, AU - Henderson,A John, AU - Emmett,Pauline M, AU - Sherriff,Andrea, AU - Calder,Philip C, PY - 2004/9/10/pubmed PY - 2004/10/22/medline PY - 2004/9/10/entrez SP - 531 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. VL - 114 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies have explored whether fetal exposure to n-6 and n-3 fatty acids influences the inception of atopic disease. OBJECTIVE: To assess prenatal fatty acid exposures as predictors of early childhood wheezing and eczema. METHODS: In the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, late pregnancy maternal blood samples and umbilical cord blood samples were assayed for n-6 and n-3 fatty acids (percentage of total red cell phospholipid), and mothers were asked about wheezing and eczema in their children. We measured associations of 11 n-6 and n-3 fatty acid exposures with wheezing at 30 to 42 months, with wheezing patterns defined by presence (+) or absence (-) of wheezing during 2 periods, 0 to 6 months and 30 to 42 months (transient infant, +/-; later-onset, -/+; persistent, +/+; n=1191 and n=2764 for cord and maternal analyses, respectively), and with eczema at 18 to 30 months (n=1238 and n=2945 for cord and maternal analyses, respectively). RESULTS: In cord blood red cells, the ratio of arachidonic:eicosapentaenoic acid was positively associated with eczema (adjusted odds ratio [OR] per doubling, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.00-1.31; P=.044), the ratio of linoleic acid:alpha-linolenic acid was positively associated with later-onset wheeze (OR, 1.30; CI, 1.04-1.61; P=.019), and the ratio of alpha-linolenic acid:n-3 products was negatively associated with later-onset wheeze (OR, 0.86; CI, 0.75-0.99; P=.040). However, these associations were no longer significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. CONCLUSIONS: It seems unlikely that fetal exposure to n-6 and n-3 fatty acids is an important determinant of early childhood wheezing and atopic disease. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15356553/Umbilical_cord_and_maternal_blood_red_cell_fatty_acids_and_early_childhood_wheezing_and_eczema_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091674904014678 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -