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Distress proneness and cognitive decline in a population of older persons.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jan; 30(1):11-7.P

Abstract

The association between distress proneness and cognitive decline was examined in older residents of a biracial community in Chicago. At baseline, participants completed four cognitive tests that yielded a global measure (baseline mean=101.2; standard deviation (SD)=7.8), and a brief measure of the tendency to experience negative emotions (mean=16.5; SD=6.7) based on the Neuroticism scale of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Cognitive testing was repeated twice at three-year intervals. In mixed models that controlled age, sex, race, and education, for each point on the distress proneness scale, global cognitive score was 0.12 unit lower at baseline (p<0.001) and annual rate of decline increased by 0.01 unit (p=0.002), or about 2%. Thus, cognitive decline was about 30% faster in a person highly prone to distress (score=24, 90th percentile) compared to the one low in distress proneness (score=9, 10th percentile). This effect was unchanged after controlling for level of cognitive activity or excluding people with cognitive impairment at baseline, but it was reduced to a trend (p=0.059) after controlling for depressive symptoms. The results suggest that the tendency to experience psychological distress is associated with increased cognitive decline in old age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center and Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. rwilson@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15358438

Citation

Wilson, Robert S., et al. "Distress Proneness and Cognitive Decline in a Population of Older Persons." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 30, no. 1, 2005, pp. 11-7.
Wilson RS, Bennett DA, Mendes de Leon CF, et al. Distress proneness and cognitive decline in a population of older persons. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005;30(1):11-7.
Wilson, R. S., Bennett, D. A., Mendes de Leon, C. F., Bienias, J. L., Morris, M. C., & Evans, D. A. (2005). Distress proneness and cognitive decline in a population of older persons. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 30(1), 11-7.
Wilson RS, et al. Distress Proneness and Cognitive Decline in a Population of Older Persons. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005;30(1):11-7. PubMed PMID: 15358438.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Distress proneness and cognitive decline in a population of older persons. AU - Wilson,Robert S, AU - Bennett,David A, AU - Mendes de Leon,Carlos F, AU - Bienias,Julia L, AU - Morris,Martha C, AU - Evans,Denis A, PY - 2003/10/17/received PY - 2004/04/23/revised PY - 2004/04/26/accepted PY - 2004/9/11/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/9/11/entrez SP - 11 EP - 7 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - The association between distress proneness and cognitive decline was examined in older residents of a biracial community in Chicago. At baseline, participants completed four cognitive tests that yielded a global measure (baseline mean=101.2; standard deviation (SD)=7.8), and a brief measure of the tendency to experience negative emotions (mean=16.5; SD=6.7) based on the Neuroticism scale of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Cognitive testing was repeated twice at three-year intervals. In mixed models that controlled age, sex, race, and education, for each point on the distress proneness scale, global cognitive score was 0.12 unit lower at baseline (p<0.001) and annual rate of decline increased by 0.01 unit (p=0.002), or about 2%. Thus, cognitive decline was about 30% faster in a person highly prone to distress (score=24, 90th percentile) compared to the one low in distress proneness (score=9, 10th percentile). This effect was unchanged after controlling for level of cognitive activity or excluding people with cognitive impairment at baseline, but it was reduced to a trend (p=0.059) after controlling for depressive symptoms. The results suggest that the tendency to experience psychological distress is associated with increased cognitive decline in old age. SN - 0306-4530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15358438/Distress_proneness_and_cognitive_decline_in_a_population_of_older_persons_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(04)00063-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -