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Bupropion for smoking cessation: a randomized trial.
Arch Intern Med. 2004 Sep 13; 164(16):1797-803.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Bupropion hydrochloride is recommended for smoking cessation; however, there have been relatively few clinical trials examining its efficacy.

METHODS

A total of 244 current smokers were enrolled in an outpatient randomized blinded smoking cessation trial conducted at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, Calif. Of the 244 participants, 121 received a 7-week course of bupropion and 123 received placebo. All participants received 2 months of transdermal nicotine replacement therapy and 3 months of cognitive-behavioral counseling. We determined on-medication treatment, end-of-medication treatment, 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year quit rates.

RESULTS

During treatment with bupropion vs placebo, there was a trend toward increased quit rates among participants randomized to bupropion; the self-reported end-of-medication treatment quit rates were 64% for the bupropion group vs 57% for the placebo group (P =.23). The trend favoring bupropion persisted at 3 months of follow-up (P =.12) but was not apparent at 6 months and 1 year of follow-up (both P>.78). The 12-month quit rates, validated by either saliva cotinine or spousal proxy, were 22% in the bupropion group and 28% in the placebo group (P =.31). Based on biochemical validation, 19% of the bupropion group vs 24% of the placebo group had quit smoking by 1 year (P =.36).

CONCLUSIONS

In this randomized blinded trial of mostly veteran participants, the addition of a brief 7-week bupropion trial to treatment with nicotine replacement therapy and counseling did not significantly increase smoking cessation rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

General Internal Medicine Section, Medical Service, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA 94121, USA. jasimon@itsa.ucsf.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15364675

Citation

Simon, Joel A., et al. "Bupropion for Smoking Cessation: a Randomized Trial." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 164, no. 16, 2004, pp. 1797-803.
Simon JA, Duncan C, Carmody TP, et al. Bupropion for smoking cessation: a randomized trial. Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(16):1797-803.
Simon, J. A., Duncan, C., Carmody, T. P., & Hudes, E. S. (2004). Bupropion for smoking cessation: a randomized trial. Archives of Internal Medicine, 164(16), 1797-803.
Simon JA, et al. Bupropion for Smoking Cessation: a Randomized Trial. Arch Intern Med. 2004 Sep 13;164(16):1797-803. PubMed PMID: 15364675.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bupropion for smoking cessation: a randomized trial. AU - Simon,Joel A, AU - Duncan,Carol, AU - Carmody,Timothy P, AU - Hudes,Esther S, PY - 2004/9/15/pubmed PY - 2005/2/16/medline PY - 2004/9/15/entrez SP - 1797 EP - 803 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 164 IS - 16 N2 - BACKGROUND: Bupropion hydrochloride is recommended for smoking cessation; however, there have been relatively few clinical trials examining its efficacy. METHODS: A total of 244 current smokers were enrolled in an outpatient randomized blinded smoking cessation trial conducted at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, Calif. Of the 244 participants, 121 received a 7-week course of bupropion and 123 received placebo. All participants received 2 months of transdermal nicotine replacement therapy and 3 months of cognitive-behavioral counseling. We determined on-medication treatment, end-of-medication treatment, 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year quit rates. RESULTS: During treatment with bupropion vs placebo, there was a trend toward increased quit rates among participants randomized to bupropion; the self-reported end-of-medication treatment quit rates were 64% for the bupropion group vs 57% for the placebo group (P =.23). The trend favoring bupropion persisted at 3 months of follow-up (P =.12) but was not apparent at 6 months and 1 year of follow-up (both P>.78). The 12-month quit rates, validated by either saliva cotinine or spousal proxy, were 22% in the bupropion group and 28% in the placebo group (P =.31). Based on biochemical validation, 19% of the bupropion group vs 24% of the placebo group had quit smoking by 1 year (P =.36). CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized blinded trial of mostly veteran participants, the addition of a brief 7-week bupropion trial to treatment with nicotine replacement therapy and counseling did not significantly increase smoking cessation rates. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15364675/Bupropion_for_smoking_cessation:_a_randomized_trial_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.164.16.1797 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -