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Early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy nutrition in head and neck cancer patients.
Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Sep; 124(7):847-50.AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Many head and neck cancer patients suffer from poor nutrition. Nutrition is a problem during and after therapy, especially when it consists of extensive surgery, intensive (chemo)radiotherapy or their combination. Additional enteral nutrition has been provided by means of either nasogastric tube feeding, surgical gastrostomy, radiologic percutaneous gastrostomy or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Because of the straightforward, easy technique involved and its low complication rate, PEG has become established as the primary route of nutrition in these patients. Previously, the aim of assisted enteral nutrition was to compensate for already existing malnutrition; nowadays, an additional purpose is to diminish or prevent the development of malnutrition. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of pre-treatment PEG in a sample of patients with an upper aerodigestive tract area malignancy treated in a tertiary referral centre.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

A total of 79 patients with an upper aerodigestive tract area malignancy were treated with a total of 80 PEGs during the period 1997-2001.

RESULTS

Most of the PEGs (62/80; 77.5%) were performed by an otolaryngologist. An open gastrostomy was needed in five cases because of unsuccessful gastroscopy due to oesophageal stricture (n=4) or severe trismus (n=1). Both acute and late complications were minor and the respective complication rates (1/80; 1.3% and 12/80; 15%) were low. In addition, all complications were easily managed and did not seriously affect the actual treatment.

CONCLUSIONS

A major advantage of having the PEG performed by the otorhinolaryngologist was the possibility to combine it easily with other necessary procedures, such as panendoscopy, tracheostomy and additional biopsy. In addition, the timing of the procedure was easy to schedule.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, North Karelia Central Hospital, Joenuu, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15370571

Citation

Hujala, Kimmo, et al. "Early Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Nutrition in Head and Neck Cancer Patients." Acta Oto-laryngologica, vol. 124, no. 7, 2004, pp. 847-50.
Hujala K, Sipilä J, Pulkkinen J, et al. Early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy nutrition in head and neck cancer patients. Acta Otolaryngol. 2004;124(7):847-50.
Hujala, K., Sipilä, J., Pulkkinen, J., & Grenman, R. (2004). Early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy nutrition in head and neck cancer patients. Acta Oto-laryngologica, 124(7), 847-50.
Hujala K, et al. Early Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Nutrition in Head and Neck Cancer Patients. Acta Otolaryngol. 2004;124(7):847-50. PubMed PMID: 15370571.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy nutrition in head and neck cancer patients. AU - Hujala,Kimmo, AU - Sipilä,Jukka, AU - Pulkkinen,Jaakko, AU - Grenman,Reidar, PY - 2004/9/17/pubmed PY - 2005/1/5/medline PY - 2004/9/17/entrez SP - 847 EP - 50 JF - Acta oto-laryngologica JO - Acta Otolaryngol VL - 124 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Many head and neck cancer patients suffer from poor nutrition. Nutrition is a problem during and after therapy, especially when it consists of extensive surgery, intensive (chemo)radiotherapy or their combination. Additional enteral nutrition has been provided by means of either nasogastric tube feeding, surgical gastrostomy, radiologic percutaneous gastrostomy or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Because of the straightforward, easy technique involved and its low complication rate, PEG has become established as the primary route of nutrition in these patients. Previously, the aim of assisted enteral nutrition was to compensate for already existing malnutrition; nowadays, an additional purpose is to diminish or prevent the development of malnutrition. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of pre-treatment PEG in a sample of patients with an upper aerodigestive tract area malignancy treated in a tertiary referral centre. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 79 patients with an upper aerodigestive tract area malignancy were treated with a total of 80 PEGs during the period 1997-2001. RESULTS: Most of the PEGs (62/80; 77.5%) were performed by an otolaryngologist. An open gastrostomy was needed in five cases because of unsuccessful gastroscopy due to oesophageal stricture (n=4) or severe trismus (n=1). Both acute and late complications were minor and the respective complication rates (1/80; 1.3% and 12/80; 15%) were low. In addition, all complications were easily managed and did not seriously affect the actual treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A major advantage of having the PEG performed by the otorhinolaryngologist was the possibility to combine it easily with other necessary procedures, such as panendoscopy, tracheostomy and additional biopsy. In addition, the timing of the procedure was easy to schedule. SN - 0001-6489 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15370571/Early_percutaneous_endoscopic_gastrostomy_nutrition_in_head_and_neck_cancer_patients_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00016480410017440 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -