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Onset and disappearance of reflux symptoms in a Chinese population: a 1-year follow-up study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asian population has not been studied before.

AIM

To study the onset and disappearances of reflux symptoms over a 1-year period in the Chinese population.

METHODS

A population-based telephone survey was performed in 2002 and repeated 1 year later. The change in prevalence rate, onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and the change in diagnoses were assessed. Factors associated with the onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were studied.

RESULTS

A total of 712 subjects completed the first and second survey. The annual, monthly and weekly prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were 34.1%, 10.1% and 2.7% respectively. The onset rate (per 1000 person-year) and disappearance rate of any gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and frequent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (> or = monthly symptoms) were 209, 40; and 395, 243 respectively. Forty-four percentage of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease subjects changed their diagnoses in 2003. By multiple logistic regression analysis, high anxiety score (OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.2) and higher educational level (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-6.3) were associated with the onset of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; while the frequency of acid regurgitation (OR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.17-0.70) and use of antisecretory therapy (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28-0.89) were associated with the disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is stable over 1 year. Higher anxiety score and higher educational level were associated with the onset of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, while lower frequency of reflux symptoms and infrequent use of antisecretory therapy were associated with the disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in a Chinese population.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics 20:7 2004 Oct 01 pg 803-12

    MeSH

    Adult
    China
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Gastroesophageal Reflux
    Health Services
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Male
    Patient Acceptance of Health Care
    Prevalence
    Regression Analysis

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15379841

    Citation

    Wong, W M., et al. "Onset and Disappearance of Reflux Symptoms in a Chinese Population: a 1-year Follow-up Study." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 20, no. 7, 2004, pp. 803-12.
    Wong WM, Lai KC, Lam KF, et al. Onset and disappearance of reflux symptoms in a Chinese population: a 1-year follow-up study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004;20(7):803-12.
    Wong, W. M., Lai, K. C., Lam, K. F., Hui, W. M., Huang, J. Q., Xia, H. H., ... Wong, B. C. (2004). Onset and disappearance of reflux symptoms in a Chinese population: a 1-year follow-up study. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 20(7), pp. 803-12.
    Wong WM, et al. Onset and Disappearance of Reflux Symptoms in a Chinese Population: a 1-year Follow-up Study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Oct 1;20(7):803-12. PubMed PMID: 15379841.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Onset and disappearance of reflux symptoms in a Chinese population: a 1-year follow-up study. AU - Wong,W M, AU - Lai,K C, AU - Lam,K F, AU - Hui,W M, AU - Huang,J Q, AU - Xia,H H X, AU - Hu,W H C, AU - Lam,C L K, AU - Chan,C K, AU - Lam,S K, AU - Wong,B C Y, PY - 2004/9/24/pubmed PY - 2004/12/18/medline PY - 2004/9/24/entrez SP - 803 EP - 12 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 20 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asian population has not been studied before. AIM: To study the onset and disappearances of reflux symptoms over a 1-year period in the Chinese population. METHODS: A population-based telephone survey was performed in 2002 and repeated 1 year later. The change in prevalence rate, onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and the change in diagnoses were assessed. Factors associated with the onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were studied. RESULTS: A total of 712 subjects completed the first and second survey. The annual, monthly and weekly prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were 34.1%, 10.1% and 2.7% respectively. The onset rate (per 1000 person-year) and disappearance rate of any gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and frequent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (> or = monthly symptoms) were 209, 40; and 395, 243 respectively. Forty-four percentage of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease subjects changed their diagnoses in 2003. By multiple logistic regression analysis, high anxiety score (OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.2) and higher educational level (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-6.3) were associated with the onset of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; while the frequency of acid regurgitation (OR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.17-0.70) and use of antisecretory therapy (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28-0.89) were associated with the disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is stable over 1 year. Higher anxiety score and higher educational level were associated with the onset of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, while lower frequency of reflux symptoms and infrequent use of antisecretory therapy were associated with the disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in a Chinese population. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15379841/Onset_and_disappearance_of_reflux_symptoms_in_a_Chinese_population:_a_1_year_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2004.02198.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -