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Hirsutism and acne in polycystic ovary syndrome.
Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2004 Oct; 18(5):737-54.BP

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality affecting reproductive age women. Population-based studies estimate a prevalence of 5-10% [Obstet Gynecol 101 (2003) 995; Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 41 (2001) 202]. The clinical characteristics of PCOS include hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation, insulin resistance and infertility. Hyperandrogenism is generally manifested as hirsutism and acne. Both these clinical symptoms are treated with similar drug therapies, including oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), topical medications or antiandrogens such as spironolactone, flutamide and finasteride, as well as topical medications. Recent studies have shown that lower doses of these medications are as efficacious as high doses and have the advantage of decreased cost and an improved side-effect profile. Although hirsutism and acne can be considered cosmetic in nature, they cause significant social embarrassment and emotional distress. Physicians should be sensitive to these issues and approach patients in a caring and sympathetic manner.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine-0633, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0633, USA. Jarcher@ucsd.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15380144

Citation

Archer, Johanna S., and R Jeffrey Chang. "Hirsutism and Acne in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome." Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, vol. 18, no. 5, 2004, pp. 737-54.
Archer JS, Chang RJ. Hirsutism and acne in polycystic ovary syndrome. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2004;18(5):737-54.
Archer, J. S., & Chang, R. J. (2004). Hirsutism and acne in polycystic ovary syndrome. Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 18(5), 737-54.
Archer JS, Chang RJ. Hirsutism and Acne in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2004;18(5):737-54. PubMed PMID: 15380144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hirsutism and acne in polycystic ovary syndrome. AU - Archer,Johanna S, AU - Chang,R Jeffrey, PY - 2004/9/24/pubmed PY - 2005/2/4/medline PY - 2004/9/24/entrez SP - 737 EP - 54 JF - Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology JO - Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality affecting reproductive age women. Population-based studies estimate a prevalence of 5-10% [Obstet Gynecol 101 (2003) 995; Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 41 (2001) 202]. The clinical characteristics of PCOS include hyperandrogenism, chronic anovulation, insulin resistance and infertility. Hyperandrogenism is generally manifested as hirsutism and acne. Both these clinical symptoms are treated with similar drug therapies, including oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), topical medications or antiandrogens such as spironolactone, flutamide and finasteride, as well as topical medications. Recent studies have shown that lower doses of these medications are as efficacious as high doses and have the advantage of decreased cost and an improved side-effect profile. Although hirsutism and acne can be considered cosmetic in nature, they cause significant social embarrassment and emotional distress. Physicians should be sensitive to these issues and approach patients in a caring and sympathetic manner. SN - 1521-6934 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15380144/Hirsutism_and_acne_in_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1521693404000975 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -