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Applications of rapid prototyping technology in maxillofacial prosthetics.
Int J Prosthodont. 2004 Jul-Aug; 17(4):454-9.IJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy, required time, and potential advantages of rapid prototyping technology with traditional methods in the manufacture of wax patterns for two facial prostheses.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Two clinical situations were investigated: the production of an auricular prosthesis and the duplication of an existing maxillary prosthesis, using a conventional and a rapid prototyping method for each. Conventional wax patterns were created from impressions taken of a patient's remaining ear and an oral prosthesis. For the rapid prototyping method, a cast of the ear and the original maxillary prosthesis were scanned, and rapid prototyping was used to construct the wax patterns. For the auricular prosthesis, both patterns were refined clinically and then flasked and processed in silicone using routine procedures. Twenty-six independent observers evaluated these patterns by comparing them to the cast of the patient's remaining ear. For the duplication procedure, both wax patterns were scanned and compared to scans of the original prosthesis by generating color error maps to highlight volumetric changes.

RESULTS

There was a significant difference in opinions for the two auricular prostheses with regard to shape and esthetic appeal, where the hand-carved prosthesis was found to be of poorer quality. The color error maps showed higher errors with the conventional duplication process compared with the rapid prototyping method.

CONCLUSION

The main advantage of rapid prototyping is the ability to produce physical models using digital methods instead of traditional impression techniques. The disadvantage of equipment costs could be overcome by establishing a centralized service.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Prosthodontics, School of Oral Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15382782

Citation

Sykes, Leanne M., et al. "Applications of Rapid Prototyping Technology in Maxillofacial Prosthetics." The International Journal of Prosthodontics, vol. 17, no. 4, 2004, pp. 454-9.
Sykes LM, Parrott AM, Owen CP, et al. Applications of rapid prototyping technology in maxillofacial prosthetics. Int J Prosthodont. 2004;17(4):454-9.
Sykes, L. M., Parrott, A. M., Owen, C. P., & Snaddon, D. R. (2004). Applications of rapid prototyping technology in maxillofacial prosthetics. The International Journal of Prosthodontics, 17(4), 454-9.
Sykes LM, et al. Applications of Rapid Prototyping Technology in Maxillofacial Prosthetics. Int J Prosthodont. 2004 Jul-Aug;17(4):454-9. PubMed PMID: 15382782.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Applications of rapid prototyping technology in maxillofacial prosthetics. AU - Sykes,Leanne M, AU - Parrott,Andrew M, AU - Owen,C Peter, AU - Snaddon,Donald R, PY - 2004/9/24/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/9/24/entrez SP - 454 EP - 9 JF - The International journal of prosthodontics JO - Int J Prosthodont VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy, required time, and potential advantages of rapid prototyping technology with traditional methods in the manufacture of wax patterns for two facial prostheses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two clinical situations were investigated: the production of an auricular prosthesis and the duplication of an existing maxillary prosthesis, using a conventional and a rapid prototyping method for each. Conventional wax patterns were created from impressions taken of a patient's remaining ear and an oral prosthesis. For the rapid prototyping method, a cast of the ear and the original maxillary prosthesis were scanned, and rapid prototyping was used to construct the wax patterns. For the auricular prosthesis, both patterns were refined clinically and then flasked and processed in silicone using routine procedures. Twenty-six independent observers evaluated these patterns by comparing them to the cast of the patient's remaining ear. For the duplication procedure, both wax patterns were scanned and compared to scans of the original prosthesis by generating color error maps to highlight volumetric changes. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in opinions for the two auricular prostheses with regard to shape and esthetic appeal, where the hand-carved prosthesis was found to be of poorer quality. The color error maps showed higher errors with the conventional duplication process compared with the rapid prototyping method. CONCLUSION: The main advantage of rapid prototyping is the ability to produce physical models using digital methods instead of traditional impression techniques. The disadvantage of equipment costs could be overcome by establishing a centralized service. SN - 0893-2174 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15382782/Applications_of_rapid_prototyping_technology_in_maxillofacial_prosthetics_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -