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Incidence of self-reported occupational injuries in seafaring--an international study.
Occup Med (Lond). 2004 Dec; 54(8):548-55.OM

Abstract

AIMS

Seafaring is known as a high-risk industry. The aims were to describe the incidence of non-fatal injuries among seafarers, including testing the hypothesis that long working hours might result in higher injury rates.

METHODS

A questionnaire study of injury on the latest tour of duty was carried out among seafarers in 11 countries with 6461 participants. The seafarers were asked if they were injured during the latest tour of duty and what was the number of hours worked.

RESULTS

During the latest tour of duty, 9.1% of all seafarers were injured and 4.3% had an injury with at least 1 day of incapacity. The injury incidence rates for cargo ships and tankers: 39.5 per 1 million work hours and 37.6 per 100,000 days. Multivariate analyses: incidence rate ratios (IRR) for >70 working hours per week compared with <57 h: 0.90 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.61-1.32]; non-officers compared with officers: IRR = 1.57 (95% CI = 1.14-2.15); seafarers <35 years compared with > or =35 years of age: IRR = 2.11 (1.57-2.86); tour lengths > or =117 days compared with <117 days: IRR = 0.27 (0.19-0.39). Main work area on the deck and in the service area compared with work in the engine room: IRR = 0.37 (0.27-0.52) and IRR = 0.49 (0.26-0.91), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

There was no evidence that long working hours alone resulted in higher injury rates. Low self-perceived health, lack of use of personal protection and lack of occupational safety on board were significantly related to an increase in the injury risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Unit of Maritime Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark. OCJ@FMM.SDU.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15385646

Citation

Jensen, O C., et al. "Incidence of Self-reported Occupational Injuries in Seafaring--an International Study." Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England), vol. 54, no. 8, 2004, pp. 548-55.
Jensen OC, Sørensen JF, Canals ML, et al. Incidence of self-reported occupational injuries in seafaring--an international study. Occup Med (Lond). 2004;54(8):548-55.
Jensen, O. C., Sørensen, J. F., Canals, M. L., Hu, Y. P., Nikolic, N., & Thomas, M. (2004). Incidence of self-reported occupational injuries in seafaring--an international study. Occupational Medicine (Oxford, England), 54(8), 548-55.
Jensen OC, et al. Incidence of Self-reported Occupational Injuries in Seafaring--an International Study. Occup Med (Lond). 2004;54(8):548-55. PubMed PMID: 15385646.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incidence of self-reported occupational injuries in seafaring--an international study. AU - Jensen,O C, AU - Sørensen,J F L, AU - Canals,M L, AU - Hu,Y P, AU - Nikolic,N, AU - Thomas,M, Y1 - 2004/09/22/ PY - 2004/9/24/pubmed PY - 2005/4/22/medline PY - 2004/9/24/entrez SP - 548 EP - 55 JF - Occupational medicine (Oxford, England) JO - Occup Med (Lond) VL - 54 IS - 8 N2 - AIMS: Seafaring is known as a high-risk industry. The aims were to describe the incidence of non-fatal injuries among seafarers, including testing the hypothesis that long working hours might result in higher injury rates. METHODS: A questionnaire study of injury on the latest tour of duty was carried out among seafarers in 11 countries with 6461 participants. The seafarers were asked if they were injured during the latest tour of duty and what was the number of hours worked. RESULTS: During the latest tour of duty, 9.1% of all seafarers were injured and 4.3% had an injury with at least 1 day of incapacity. The injury incidence rates for cargo ships and tankers: 39.5 per 1 million work hours and 37.6 per 100,000 days. Multivariate analyses: incidence rate ratios (IRR) for >70 working hours per week compared with <57 h: 0.90 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.61-1.32]; non-officers compared with officers: IRR = 1.57 (95% CI = 1.14-2.15); seafarers <35 years compared with > or =35 years of age: IRR = 2.11 (1.57-2.86); tour lengths > or =117 days compared with <117 days: IRR = 0.27 (0.19-0.39). Main work area on the deck and in the service area compared with work in the engine room: IRR = 0.37 (0.27-0.52) and IRR = 0.49 (0.26-0.91), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence that long working hours alone resulted in higher injury rates. Low self-perceived health, lack of use of personal protection and lack of occupational safety on board were significantly related to an increase in the injury risk. SN - 0962-7480 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15385646/Incidence_of_self_reported_occupational_injuries_in_seafaring__an_international_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/occmed/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/occmed/kqh090 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -