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Depression predicts self-reported sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.
Psychosom Med. 2004 Sep-Oct; 66(5):692-7.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Depression is a common problem in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The objective of this study was to examine whether depression is independently associated with lower self-reported sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), after controlling for polysomnographic measures of sleep.

METHODS

The sample comprised 135 patients who had been referred to a university teaching hospital's multidisciplinary sleep medicine center for polysomnographic evaluation of OSA. The median age of the subjects was 45 (mean age, 46 years) 55% were female, 69% were white, 31% were black, and their mean body mass index was 37.9 +/- 11.2 kg/m2. Self-reported sleep quality during the past 2 weeks was assessed by the insomnia severity index. Polygraphic measures of sleep quality included the respiratory disturbance index, sleep onset latency, arousals for no apparent reason, sleep efficiency, and periodic leg movements associated with arousal. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory.

RESULTS

None of the polygraphic measures of sleep quality was related to self-reported sleep quality or depression. Oxygen desaturation was correlated with self-reported sleep quality (r = 0.21, p =.02). Depression correlated with self-reported sleep quality (r = 0.55, p <.0001). In a multiple regression analysis, depression remained a significant predictor of self-reported sleep quality after controlling for all of the polysomnographic measures of sleep quality (F = 9.65, partial r2 = 0.28 p =.0001).

CONCLUSION

Depression is a better predictor of self-reported sleep quality than are polysomnographic measures of sleep in patients with OSA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1125, St. Louis, Missouri 63130-4899, USA. rdwells@artsci.wustl.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15385693

Citation

Wells, Rachel D., et al. "Depression Predicts Self-reported Sleep Quality in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 66, no. 5, 2004, pp. 692-7.
Wells RD, Day RC, Carney RM, et al. Depression predicts self-reported sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Psychosom Med. 2004;66(5):692-7.
Wells, R. D., Day, R. C., Carney, R. M., Freedland, K. E., & Duntley, S. P. (2004). Depression predicts self-reported sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Psychosomatic Medicine, 66(5), 692-7.
Wells RD, et al. Depression Predicts Self-reported Sleep Quality in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Psychosom Med. 2004 Sep-Oct;66(5):692-7. PubMed PMID: 15385693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depression predicts self-reported sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. AU - Wells,Rachel D, AU - Day,Ryan C, AU - Carney,Robert M, AU - Freedland,Kenneth E, AU - Duntley,Stephen P, PY - 2004/9/24/pubmed PY - 2005/4/5/medline PY - 2004/9/24/entrez SP - 692 EP - 7 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 66 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Depression is a common problem in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The objective of this study was to examine whether depression is independently associated with lower self-reported sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), after controlling for polysomnographic measures of sleep. METHODS: The sample comprised 135 patients who had been referred to a university teaching hospital's multidisciplinary sleep medicine center for polysomnographic evaluation of OSA. The median age of the subjects was 45 (mean age, 46 years) 55% were female, 69% were white, 31% were black, and their mean body mass index was 37.9 +/- 11.2 kg/m2. Self-reported sleep quality during the past 2 weeks was assessed by the insomnia severity index. Polygraphic measures of sleep quality included the respiratory disturbance index, sleep onset latency, arousals for no apparent reason, sleep efficiency, and periodic leg movements associated with arousal. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: None of the polygraphic measures of sleep quality was related to self-reported sleep quality or depression. Oxygen desaturation was correlated with self-reported sleep quality (r = 0.21, p =.02). Depression correlated with self-reported sleep quality (r = 0.55, p <.0001). In a multiple regression analysis, depression remained a significant predictor of self-reported sleep quality after controlling for all of the polysomnographic measures of sleep quality (F = 9.65, partial r2 = 0.28 p =.0001). CONCLUSION: Depression is a better predictor of self-reported sleep quality than are polysomnographic measures of sleep in patients with OSA. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15385693/Depression_predicts_self_reported_sleep_quality_in_patients_with_obstructive_sleep_apnea_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.psy.0000140002.84288.e1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -