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Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.
Int J Cancer 2005; 113(1):126-32IJ

Abstract

Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control study of sporadic colorectal adenomas (278 cases; 414 polyp-free controls). Direct-sequencing was used to screen adenomas for mutations in the mutation cluster region of APC; truncating mutations were detected in 161 (58%) of the adenomas. Red meat consumption was significantly differently related to polyps with truncating APC mutation (APC(+) polyps) compared to polyps without truncating APC mutation (APC(-) polyps) (highest vs. lowest tertile, odds ratio [OR] = 0.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3-1.0). High intake of red meat and fat seemed to increase the risk of APC(-) polyps only (APC(+) vs. controls: red meat, OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.6-1.6; fat, OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.6-1.9; APC(-) vs. controls: red meat, OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.1; fat, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.7). Intake of carbohydrates was inversely associated with both polyp groups, most noticeably with APC(-) polyps. Most other evaluated dietary factors were not distinctively associated with a specific APC status. None of the dietary factors was specifically associated with a particular type of truncating APC mutation. Our data suggest that red meat and fat may increase the risk of APC(-) polyps in particular, whereas carbohydrates may especially decrease the risk of APC(-) polyps. However, most examined dietary factors do not appear to be specifically associated with the occurrence of truncating APC mutations in colorectal adenomas but seem to affect both pathways equally.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Human Nutrition and Epidemiology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15386431

Citation

Diergaarde, Brenda, et al. "Dietary Factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 113, no. 1, 2005, pp. 126-32.
Diergaarde B, Tiemersma EW, Braam H, et al. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas. Int J Cancer. 2005;113(1):126-32.
Diergaarde, B., Tiemersma, E. W., Braam, H., van Muijen, G. N., Nagengast, F. M., Kok, F. J., & Kampman, E. (2005). Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas. International Journal of Cancer, 113(1), pp. 126-32.
Diergaarde B, et al. Dietary Factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas. Int J Cancer. 2005 Jan 1;113(1):126-32. PubMed PMID: 15386431.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas. AU - Diergaarde,Brenda, AU - Tiemersma,Edine W, AU - Braam,Hanneke, AU - van Muijen,Goos N P, AU - Nagengast,Fokko M, AU - Kok,Frans J, AU - Kampman,Ellen, PY - 2004/9/24/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/9/24/entrez SP - 126 EP - 32 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 113 IS - 1 N2 - Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control study of sporadic colorectal adenomas (278 cases; 414 polyp-free controls). Direct-sequencing was used to screen adenomas for mutations in the mutation cluster region of APC; truncating mutations were detected in 161 (58%) of the adenomas. Red meat consumption was significantly differently related to polyps with truncating APC mutation (APC(+) polyps) compared to polyps without truncating APC mutation (APC(-) polyps) (highest vs. lowest tertile, odds ratio [OR] = 0.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3-1.0). High intake of red meat and fat seemed to increase the risk of APC(-) polyps only (APC(+) vs. controls: red meat, OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.6-1.6; fat, OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.6-1.9; APC(-) vs. controls: red meat, OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.1; fat, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.7). Intake of carbohydrates was inversely associated with both polyp groups, most noticeably with APC(-) polyps. Most other evaluated dietary factors were not distinctively associated with a specific APC status. None of the dietary factors was specifically associated with a particular type of truncating APC mutation. Our data suggest that red meat and fat may increase the risk of APC(-) polyps in particular, whereas carbohydrates may especially decrease the risk of APC(-) polyps. However, most examined dietary factors do not appear to be specifically associated with the occurrence of truncating APC mutations in colorectal adenomas but seem to affect both pathways equally. SN - 0020-7136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15386431/Dietary_factors_and_truncating_APC_mutations_in_sporadic_colorectal_adenomas_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.20533 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -