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HIV-infected US youth are at high risk of obesity and poor diet quality: a challenge for improving short- and long-term health outcomes.
J Am Diet Assoc 2004; 104(10):1554-60JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relationships among dietary quality, weight status, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in US adolescents and young adults.

DESIGN

This cross-sectional study was embedded in the Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health cohort study of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected, at-risk youth. Biochemical, clinical, and sociodemographic data were available. Dietary intake was collected using the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire and a modified Healthy Eating Index was calculated to measure diet quality.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Participants included 264 HIV-infected and 127 HIV-uninfected youth 13 to 23 years old (75.2% women, 67.3% African American/non-Hispanic, 20.5% Hispanic, 12.3% other) at 14 clinic sites.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED

Determinants of obesity and the modified Healthy Eating Index were tested using logistic and generalized linear regression.

RESULTS

About half (51.7%) of participants were overweight or obese. Obesity was positively associated with being a woman, living independently, watching television >or=3 hours per day, previous dieting, and being from the northeastern or southern United States. Youth who were HIV uninfected or HIV infected with CD4 + T cells >or=500 cells/microL had similar obesity rates; overweight (25%) and obesity (20%) was prevalent among women even with CD4 + T cells <200 cells/microL. The modified Healthy Eating Index score was 56.2+/-0.6, reflecting a diet needing improvement. HIV infection, watching television >or=3 hours/day, and being from the Chicago, IL, area were associated with a lower-quality diet.

CONCLUSIONS

Obesity is a common nutrition problem for both HIV-infected and uninfected youth; however, HIV-infected youth are at increased risk of developing metabolic abnormalities. Culturally appropriate, client-focused nutrition education will help youth improve their diet and increase physical activity to reduce health consequences associated with both obesity and HIV infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University, Ames 50011, USA. lkruzich@iastate.edu <lkruzich@iastate.edu>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15389413

Citation

Kruzich, Laurie A., et al. "HIV-infected US Youth Are at High Risk of Obesity and Poor Diet Quality: a Challenge for Improving Short- and Long-term Health Outcomes." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1554-60.
Kruzich LA, Marquis GS, Wilson CM, et al. HIV-infected US youth are at high risk of obesity and poor diet quality: a challenge for improving short- and long-term health outcomes. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(10):1554-60.
Kruzich, L. A., Marquis, G. S., Wilson, C. M., & Stephensen, C. B. (2004). HIV-infected US youth are at high risk of obesity and poor diet quality: a challenge for improving short- and long-term health outcomes. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(10), pp. 1554-60.
Kruzich LA, et al. HIV-infected US Youth Are at High Risk of Obesity and Poor Diet Quality: a Challenge for Improving Short- and Long-term Health Outcomes. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(10):1554-60. PubMed PMID: 15389413.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HIV-infected US youth are at high risk of obesity and poor diet quality: a challenge for improving short- and long-term health outcomes. AU - Kruzich,Laurie A, AU - Marquis,Grace S, AU - Wilson,Craig M, AU - Stephensen,Charles B, PY - 2004/9/25/pubmed PY - 2004/11/4/medline PY - 2004/9/25/entrez SP - 1554 EP - 60 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationships among dietary quality, weight status, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in US adolescents and young adults. DESIGN: This cross-sectional study was embedded in the Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health cohort study of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected, at-risk youth. Biochemical, clinical, and sociodemographic data were available. Dietary intake was collected using the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire and a modified Healthy Eating Index was calculated to measure diet quality. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Participants included 264 HIV-infected and 127 HIV-uninfected youth 13 to 23 years old (75.2% women, 67.3% African American/non-Hispanic, 20.5% Hispanic, 12.3% other) at 14 clinic sites. STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Determinants of obesity and the modified Healthy Eating Index were tested using logistic and generalized linear regression. RESULTS: About half (51.7%) of participants were overweight or obese. Obesity was positively associated with being a woman, living independently, watching television >or=3 hours per day, previous dieting, and being from the northeastern or southern United States. Youth who were HIV uninfected or HIV infected with CD4 + T cells >or=500 cells/microL had similar obesity rates; overweight (25%) and obesity (20%) was prevalent among women even with CD4 + T cells <200 cells/microL. The modified Healthy Eating Index score was 56.2+/-0.6, reflecting a diet needing improvement. HIV infection, watching television >or=3 hours/day, and being from the Chicago, IL, area were associated with a lower-quality diet. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity is a common nutrition problem for both HIV-infected and uninfected youth; however, HIV-infected youth are at increased risk of developing metabolic abnormalities. Culturally appropriate, client-focused nutrition education will help youth improve their diet and increase physical activity to reduce health consequences associated with both obesity and HIV infection. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15389413/HIV_infected_US_youth_are_at_high_risk_of_obesity_and_poor_diet_quality:_a_challenge_for_improving_short__and_long_term_health_outcomes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822304012544 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -