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Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.
Mov Disord. 2005 Feb; 20(2):212-7.MD

Abstract

To study prevalence of hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a 1-year period, and identify factors predictive of the onset of hallucinations in patients who were hallucination-free at baseline, 141 unselected outpatients with PD were evaluated prospectively for a set of demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables and the presence of hallucinations during the previous 3 months. Patient groups were compared with nonparametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Follow-up data were available for 127 patients. The hallucination prevalence rates (%) at the first and second evaluation were, respectively, 41.7 and 49.6 for hallucinations of all types (NS), 29.1 and 40.2 for minor hallucinations (i.e., presence or passage hallucinations, and illusions) (P = 0.02), 22.8 and 21.2 for formed visual hallucinations (NS), and 8.7 and 8.7 for auditory hallucinations (NS). Hallucinations rarely started or ceased during the study. The most labile forms were minor hallucinations, which developed in 20% of patients and ceased in 9%. During follow-up, 15% of patients started to hallucinate. Three factors, all present at the first evaluation, independently predicted the onset of hallucinations in patients previously free of hallucinations at baseline (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): severe sleep disturbances (14.3; 2.5-80.9), ocular disorders (9.1; 1.6-52.0), and a high axial motor score (5.7; 1.2-27.4). Hallucinations have a chronic course in most parkinsonian patients. Factors predicting the onset of hallucinations point to a role of extranigral brainstem involvement and a nonspecific, facilitating role of ocular disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service de Neurologie, Hôpital Maison Blanche, Reims, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15390044

Citation

de Maindreville, Anne Doé, et al. "Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease: a Follow-up Study." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 20, no. 2, 2005, pp. 212-7.
de Maindreville AD, Fénelon G, Mahieux F. Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study. Mov Disord. 2005;20(2):212-7.
de Maindreville, A. D., Fénelon, G., & Mahieux, F. (2005). Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 20(2), 212-7.
de Maindreville AD, Fénelon G, Mahieux F. Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease: a Follow-up Study. Mov Disord. 2005;20(2):212-7. PubMed PMID: 15390044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study. AU - de Maindreville,Anne Doé, AU - Fénelon,Gilles, AU - Mahieux,Florence, PY - 2004/9/25/pubmed PY - 2005/4/26/medline PY - 2004/9/25/entrez SP - 212 EP - 7 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov Disord VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - To study prevalence of hallucinations in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a 1-year period, and identify factors predictive of the onset of hallucinations in patients who were hallucination-free at baseline, 141 unselected outpatients with PD were evaluated prospectively for a set of demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables and the presence of hallucinations during the previous 3 months. Patient groups were compared with nonparametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Follow-up data were available for 127 patients. The hallucination prevalence rates (%) at the first and second evaluation were, respectively, 41.7 and 49.6 for hallucinations of all types (NS), 29.1 and 40.2 for minor hallucinations (i.e., presence or passage hallucinations, and illusions) (P = 0.02), 22.8 and 21.2 for formed visual hallucinations (NS), and 8.7 and 8.7 for auditory hallucinations (NS). Hallucinations rarely started or ceased during the study. The most labile forms were minor hallucinations, which developed in 20% of patients and ceased in 9%. During follow-up, 15% of patients started to hallucinate. Three factors, all present at the first evaluation, independently predicted the onset of hallucinations in patients previously free of hallucinations at baseline (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): severe sleep disturbances (14.3; 2.5-80.9), ocular disorders (9.1; 1.6-52.0), and a high axial motor score (5.7; 1.2-27.4). Hallucinations have a chronic course in most parkinsonian patients. Factors predicting the onset of hallucinations point to a role of extranigral brainstem involvement and a nonspecific, facilitating role of ocular disorders. SN - 0885-3185 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15390044/Hallucinations_in_Parkinson's_disease:_a_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.20263 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -