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Metoclopramide-induced tardive dyskinesia in an infant.
Mov Disord 2005; 20(1):86-9MD

Abstract

We describe a 1-year-old girl who developed orofaciolingual stereotypy at age 2 months after a 17-day treatment with metoclopramide for gastroesophageal reflux. The stereotypy, documented by sequential videos, persisted for at least 9 months after the drug was discontinued. This patient represents the first documented case of tardive dyskinesia in an infant. We also review previous reports of tardive dyskinesia in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15390048

Citation

Mejia, Nicte I., and Joseph Jankovic. "Metoclopramide-induced Tardive Dyskinesia in an Infant." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 20, no. 1, 2005, pp. 86-9.
Mejia NI, Jankovic J. Metoclopramide-induced tardive dyskinesia in an infant. Mov Disord. 2005;20(1):86-9.
Mejia, N. I., & Jankovic, J. (2005). Metoclopramide-induced tardive dyskinesia in an infant. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 20(1), pp. 86-9.
Mejia NI, Jankovic J. Metoclopramide-induced Tardive Dyskinesia in an Infant. Mov Disord. 2005;20(1):86-9. PubMed PMID: 15390048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metoclopramide-induced tardive dyskinesia in an infant. AU - Mejia,Nicte I, AU - Jankovic,Joseph, PY - 2004/9/25/pubmed PY - 2005/5/10/medline PY - 2004/9/25/entrez SP - 86 EP - 9 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov. Disord. VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - We describe a 1-year-old girl who developed orofaciolingual stereotypy at age 2 months after a 17-day treatment with metoclopramide for gastroesophageal reflux. The stereotypy, documented by sequential videos, persisted for at least 9 months after the drug was discontinued. This patient represents the first documented case of tardive dyskinesia in an infant. We also review previous reports of tardive dyskinesia in children. SN - 0885-3185 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15390048/Metoclopramide_induced_tardive_dyskinesia_in_an_infant_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.20259 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -