Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Diagnosis of food allergy in children].
Ann Pediatr (Paris) 1992; 39(1):5-12AP

Abstract

In infants, food allergies are usually manifested by digestive symptoms and the most commonly involved antigens are cow's milk proteins. Although the full range of clinical manifestations of cow's milk protein sensitivity may occur as soon as birth, enteropathy is the most common pattern. As the infant grows, cow's milk antigens lose their predominance as the causative agents of adverse reactions to foods. All foods may be involved, and consequently diagnostic evaluation is more difficult. The gastrointestinal tract is no longer the preferred target organ and symptoms of food allergy may be systemic, cutaneous or, in a smaller number of cases, respiratory. History taking is the first step of the diagnostic process and provides very valuable data. Skin tests and in vitro detection of specific IgE antibodies are then performed. Results of the skin tests may help select the most appropriate in vitro tests. Diagnosis is always established by diet modifications using diets free of the suspected offending food, followed by challenge tests. Intestinal permeability tests provide a noninvasive means for demonstrating intestinal reactivity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Consultation de Pédiatrie, Hôpital Saint Vincent de Paul, Paris.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

1539933

Citation

Dupont, C, and E Barau. "[Diagnosis of Food Allergy in Children]." Annales De Pediatrie, vol. 39, no. 1, 1992, pp. 5-12.
Dupont C, Barau E. [Diagnosis of food allergy in children]. Ann Pediatr (Paris). 1992;39(1):5-12.
Dupont, C., & Barau, E. (1992). [Diagnosis of food allergy in children]. Annales De Pediatrie, 39(1), pp. 5-12.
Dupont C, Barau E. [Diagnosis of Food Allergy in Children]. Ann Pediatr (Paris). 1992;39(1):5-12. PubMed PMID: 1539933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Diagnosis of food allergy in children]. AU - Dupont,C, AU - Barau,E, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez SP - 5 EP - 12 JF - Annales de pediatrie JO - Ann Pediatr (Paris) VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - In infants, food allergies are usually manifested by digestive symptoms and the most commonly involved antigens are cow's milk proteins. Although the full range of clinical manifestations of cow's milk protein sensitivity may occur as soon as birth, enteropathy is the most common pattern. As the infant grows, cow's milk antigens lose their predominance as the causative agents of adverse reactions to foods. All foods may be involved, and consequently diagnostic evaluation is more difficult. The gastrointestinal tract is no longer the preferred target organ and symptoms of food allergy may be systemic, cutaneous or, in a smaller number of cases, respiratory. History taking is the first step of the diagnostic process and provides very valuable data. Skin tests and in vitro detection of specific IgE antibodies are then performed. Results of the skin tests may help select the most appropriate in vitro tests. Diagnosis is always established by diet modifications using diets free of the suspected offending food, followed by challenge tests. Intestinal permeability tests provide a noninvasive means for demonstrating intestinal reactivity. SN - 0066-2097 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1539933/[Diagnosis_of_food_allergy_in_children]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodallergy.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -