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Prediction of daily energy expenditure during a feeding trial using measurements of resting energy expenditure, fat-free mass, or Harris-Benedict equations.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct; 80(4):876-80.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

During feeding trials, it is useful to predict daily energy expenditure (DEE) to estimate energy requirements and to assess subject compliance.

OBJECTIVE

We examined predictors of DEE during a feeding trial conducted in a clinical research center.

DESIGN

During a 28-d period, all food consumed by 26 healthy, nonobese, young adults was provided by the investigators. Energy intake was adjusted to maintain constant body weight. Before and after this period, fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass were assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and DEE was estimated from the change (after - before) in body energy (DeltaBE) and in observed energy intake (EI): DEE = EI - DeltaBE. We examined the relation of DEE to pretrial resting energy expenditure (REE), FFM, REE derived from the average of REE and calculated from FFM [REE = (21.2 x FFM) + 415], and an estimate of DEE based on the Harris-Benedict equation (HB estimate) (DEE = 1.6 REE).

RESULTS

DEE correlated (P < 0.001) with FFM (r = 0.78), REE (r = 0.73), average REE (r = 0.82), and the HB estimate (r = 0.81). In a multiple regression model containing all these variables, R(2) was 0.70. The mean (+/-SEM) ratios of DEE to REE, to average REE, and to the HB estimate were 1.86 +/- 0.06, 1.79 +/- 0.04, and 1.02 +/- 0.02, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Although a slightly improved prediction of DEE is possible with multiple measurements, each of these measurements suggests that DEE equals 1.60-1.86 x REE. The findings are similar to those of previous studies that describe the relation of REE to DEE measured directly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch and the Shriners Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX, USA. clkien@utmb.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15447893

Citation

Kien, C Lawrence, and Figen Ugrasbul. "Prediction of Daily Energy Expenditure During a Feeding Trial Using Measurements of Resting Energy Expenditure, Fat-free Mass, or Harris-Benedict Equations." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 80, no. 4, 2004, pp. 876-80.
Kien CL, Ugrasbul F. Prediction of daily energy expenditure during a feeding trial using measurements of resting energy expenditure, fat-free mass, or Harris-Benedict equations. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80(4):876-80.
Kien, C. L., & Ugrasbul, F. (2004). Prediction of daily energy expenditure during a feeding trial using measurements of resting energy expenditure, fat-free mass, or Harris-Benedict equations. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 80(4), 876-80.
Kien CL, Ugrasbul F. Prediction of Daily Energy Expenditure During a Feeding Trial Using Measurements of Resting Energy Expenditure, Fat-free Mass, or Harris-Benedict Equations. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80(4):876-80. PubMed PMID: 15447893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prediction of daily energy expenditure during a feeding trial using measurements of resting energy expenditure, fat-free mass, or Harris-Benedict equations. AU - Kien,C Lawrence, AU - Ugrasbul,Figen, PY - 2004/9/28/pubmed PY - 2004/10/20/medline PY - 2004/9/28/entrez SP - 876 EP - 80 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 80 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: During feeding trials, it is useful to predict daily energy expenditure (DEE) to estimate energy requirements and to assess subject compliance. OBJECTIVE: We examined predictors of DEE during a feeding trial conducted in a clinical research center. DESIGN: During a 28-d period, all food consumed by 26 healthy, nonobese, young adults was provided by the investigators. Energy intake was adjusted to maintain constant body weight. Before and after this period, fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass were assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and DEE was estimated from the change (after - before) in body energy (DeltaBE) and in observed energy intake (EI): DEE = EI - DeltaBE. We examined the relation of DEE to pretrial resting energy expenditure (REE), FFM, REE derived from the average of REE and calculated from FFM [REE = (21.2 x FFM) + 415], and an estimate of DEE based on the Harris-Benedict equation (HB estimate) (DEE = 1.6 REE). RESULTS: DEE correlated (P < 0.001) with FFM (r = 0.78), REE (r = 0.73), average REE (r = 0.82), and the HB estimate (r = 0.81). In a multiple regression model containing all these variables, R(2) was 0.70. The mean (+/-SEM) ratios of DEE to REE, to average REE, and to the HB estimate were 1.86 +/- 0.06, 1.79 +/- 0.04, and 1.02 +/- 0.02, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Although a slightly improved prediction of DEE is possible with multiple measurements, each of these measurements suggests that DEE equals 1.60-1.86 x REE. The findings are similar to those of previous studies that describe the relation of REE to DEE measured directly. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15447893/Prediction_of_daily_energy_expenditure_during_a_feeding_trial_using_measurements_of_resting_energy_expenditure_fat_free_mass_or_Harris_Benedict_equations_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/80.4.876 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -