Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Alcohol intake as a risk factor for fracture.

Abstract

High intakes of alcohol have adverse effects on skeletal health, but evidence for the effects of moderate consumption are less secure. The aim of this study was to quantify this risk on an international basis and explore the relationship of this risk with age, sex, and bone mineral density (BMD). We studied 5,939 men and 11,032 women from three prospectively studied cohorts comprising CaMos, DOES, and the Rotterdam Study. Cohorts were followed for a total of 75,433 person-years. The effect of reported alcohol intake on the risk of any fracture, any osteoporotic fracture, and hip fracture alone was examined using a Poisson model for each sex from each cohort. Covariates examined included age and BMD. The results of the different studies were merged using weighted beta-coefficients. Alcohol intake was associated with a significant increase in osteoporotic and hip fracture risk, but the effect was nonlinear. No significant increase in risk was observed at intakes of 2 units or less daily. Above this threshold, alcohol intake was associated with an increased risk of any fracture (risk ratio [RR] = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.43), any osteoporotic fracture (RR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.16-1.65), or hip fracture (RR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.36). There was no significant interaction with age, BMD, or time since baseline assessment. Risk ratios were moderately but not significantly higher in men than in women, and there was no evidence for a different threshold for effect by gender. We conclude that reported intake of alcohol confers a risk of some importance beyond that explained by BMD. The validation of this risk factor on an international basis permits its use in case-finding strategies.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK. w.j.pontefract@shef.ac.uk

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Factors
    Alcohol Drinking
    Bone Density
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Fractures, Bone
    Hip Fractures
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Osteoporosis
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Sex Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15455194

    Citation

    Kanis, John A., et al. "Alcohol Intake as a Risk Factor for Fracture." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 16, no. 7, 2005, pp. 737-42.
    Kanis JA, Johansson H, Johnell O, et al. Alcohol intake as a risk factor for fracture. Osteoporos Int. 2005;16(7):737-42.
    Kanis, J. A., Johansson, H., Johnell, O., Oden, A., De Laet, C., Eisman, J. A., ... Tenenhouse, A. (2005). Alcohol intake as a risk factor for fracture. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 16(7), pp. 737-42.
    Kanis JA, et al. Alcohol Intake as a Risk Factor for Fracture. Osteoporos Int. 2005;16(7):737-42. PubMed PMID: 15455194.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol intake as a risk factor for fracture. AU - Kanis,John A, AU - Johansson,Helena, AU - Johnell,Olof, AU - Oden,Anders, AU - De Laet,Chris, AU - Eisman,John A, AU - Pols,Huibert, AU - Tenenhouse,Alan, Y1 - 2004/09/29/ PY - 2004/03/18/received PY - 2004/08/03/accepted PY - 2004/9/30/pubmed PY - 2005/10/26/medline PY - 2004/9/30/entrez SP - 737 EP - 42 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 16 IS - 7 N2 - High intakes of alcohol have adverse effects on skeletal health, but evidence for the effects of moderate consumption are less secure. The aim of this study was to quantify this risk on an international basis and explore the relationship of this risk with age, sex, and bone mineral density (BMD). We studied 5,939 men and 11,032 women from three prospectively studied cohorts comprising CaMos, DOES, and the Rotterdam Study. Cohorts were followed for a total of 75,433 person-years. The effect of reported alcohol intake on the risk of any fracture, any osteoporotic fracture, and hip fracture alone was examined using a Poisson model for each sex from each cohort. Covariates examined included age and BMD. The results of the different studies were merged using weighted beta-coefficients. Alcohol intake was associated with a significant increase in osteoporotic and hip fracture risk, but the effect was nonlinear. No significant increase in risk was observed at intakes of 2 units or less daily. Above this threshold, alcohol intake was associated with an increased risk of any fracture (risk ratio [RR] = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.43), any osteoporotic fracture (RR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.16-1.65), or hip fracture (RR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.36). There was no significant interaction with age, BMD, or time since baseline assessment. Risk ratios were moderately but not significantly higher in men than in women, and there was no evidence for a different threshold for effect by gender. We conclude that reported intake of alcohol confers a risk of some importance beyond that explained by BMD. The validation of this risk factor on an international basis permits its use in case-finding strategies. SN - 0937-941X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15455194/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-004-1734-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -