Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fruits, vegetables and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a prospective study of Swedish women.

Abstract

Findings of epidemiologic studies on the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk have been inconclusive. To study the association between fruits and vegetables and risk of RCC in a population-based prospective cohort study of Swedish women, we collected dietary information from 61,000 women age 40-76 years by a food-frequency questionnaire. During 13.4 years of follow-up 122 women developed RCC. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Women consuming 5 or more servings of fruit and vegetables daily had a relative risk of 0.59 (95% CI = 0.26-1.34) in comparison to them consuming less than once daily. When fruits and vegetables were examined separately, those who consumed more than 75 servings per month of fruits or vegetables had multivariate relative risk of 0.59 (95% CI = 0.27-1.25) and 0.60 (95% CI = 0.31-1.17) respectively, compared to those consuming 11 or less servings per month. Within the group of fruits, the strongest inverse association was observed for banana (p = 0.07 by Wald test). The risk of RCC increased monotonically with increasing intake frequencies of fruit juice (p-value for trend = 0.10). Within the group of vegetables, the strongest inverse association was observed for root vegetables (p = 0.03 by Wald test). The risk of RCC decreased with increasing consumption frequencies of white cabbage (p for trend = 0.07). Frequent consumption of salad vegetables (once or more per day) decreased the risk by 40% (RR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.30-1.22), in comparison to no consumption. Our results suggested that high consumption of fruits and vegetables might be associated with reduced risk of RCC.

Links

  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Bahram.Rashidkhani@imm.ki.se

    ,

    Source

    International journal of cancer 113:3 2005 Jan 20 pg 451-5

    MeSH

    Aged
    Carcinoma, Renal Cell
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Female
    Fruit
    Genetics, Population
    Humans
    Kidney Neoplasms
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Sweden
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15455348

    Citation

    Rashidkhani, Bahram, et al. "Fruits, Vegetables and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma: a Prospective Study of Swedish Women." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 113, no. 3, 2005, pp. 451-5.
    Rashidkhani B, Lindblad P, Wolk A. Fruits, vegetables and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a prospective study of Swedish women. Int J Cancer. 2005;113(3):451-5.
    Rashidkhani, B., Lindblad, P., & Wolk, A. (2005). Fruits, vegetables and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a prospective study of Swedish women. International Journal of Cancer, 113(3), pp. 451-5.
    Rashidkhani B, Lindblad P, Wolk A. Fruits, Vegetables and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma: a Prospective Study of Swedish Women. Int J Cancer. 2005 Jan 20;113(3):451-5. PubMed PMID: 15455348.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fruits, vegetables and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a prospective study of Swedish women. AU - Rashidkhani,Bahram, AU - Lindblad,Per, AU - Wolk,Alicja, PY - 2004/9/30/pubmed PY - 2005/1/19/medline PY - 2004/9/30/entrez SP - 451 EP - 5 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 113 IS - 3 N2 - Findings of epidemiologic studies on the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk have been inconclusive. To study the association between fruits and vegetables and risk of RCC in a population-based prospective cohort study of Swedish women, we collected dietary information from 61,000 women age 40-76 years by a food-frequency questionnaire. During 13.4 years of follow-up 122 women developed RCC. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Women consuming 5 or more servings of fruit and vegetables daily had a relative risk of 0.59 (95% CI = 0.26-1.34) in comparison to them consuming less than once daily. When fruits and vegetables were examined separately, those who consumed more than 75 servings per month of fruits or vegetables had multivariate relative risk of 0.59 (95% CI = 0.27-1.25) and 0.60 (95% CI = 0.31-1.17) respectively, compared to those consuming 11 or less servings per month. Within the group of fruits, the strongest inverse association was observed for banana (p = 0.07 by Wald test). The risk of RCC increased monotonically with increasing intake frequencies of fruit juice (p-value for trend = 0.10). Within the group of vegetables, the strongest inverse association was observed for root vegetables (p = 0.03 by Wald test). The risk of RCC decreased with increasing consumption frequencies of white cabbage (p for trend = 0.07). Frequent consumption of salad vegetables (once or more per day) decreased the risk by 40% (RR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.30-1.22), in comparison to no consumption. Our results suggested that high consumption of fruits and vegetables might be associated with reduced risk of RCC. SN - 0020-7136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15455348/Fruits_vegetables_and_risk_of_renal_cell_carcinoma:_a_prospective_study_of_Swedish_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.20577 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -