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Height and body mass index in relation to esophageal cancer; 23-year follow-up of two million Norwegian men and women.
Cancer Causes Control 2004; 15(8):837-43CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Associations between body mass index (BMI) and stature and cancers at different sites have been explored in a number of studies. For esophageal cancer there seems to be different effects of BMI for different histological subtypes. We explored these relations in a Norwegian cohort.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Height and weight were measured in 2 million Norwegians during 1963-2001. During follow-up, 2245 histologically verified esophageal cancer cases were registered. Relative risks (RR) of esophageal cancer were estimated using proportional Cox regression.

RESULTS

Compared with normal weighted (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OA) was observed in overweight men (BMI 25-29 kg/m(2)): RR=1.80 (95% CI: 1.48-2.19) and in obese men (BMI > or =30 kg/m(2)): RR=2.58 (95% CI: 1.81-3.68). The corresponding risk estimates for women were RR=1.64 (95% CI: 1.08-2.49) and RR=2.06 (95% CI: 1.25-3.39). The opposite relation was observed for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). For overweight men the RR of OSCC was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.63-0.82) and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50-0.93) for obese. The corresponding RR estimates for women were 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42-0.65) and 0.43 (95% CI: 0.32-0.59). In addition, the lowest men had the highest risk of esophageal cancer in general. Adjustment for smoking did not change these relations.

CONCLUSION

BMI had opposite relations to the two most common histological groups of esophageal cancer. While low BMI increased the risk of OSCC, high BMI increased the risk of OA. An increased risk of esophageal cancer was found in the lowest men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. anders.engeland@fhi.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15456997

Citation

Engeland, Anders, et al. "Height and Body Mass Index in Relation to Esophageal Cancer; 23-year Follow-up of Two Million Norwegian Men and Women." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 15, no. 8, 2004, pp. 837-43.
Engeland A, Tretli S, Bjørge T. Height and body mass index in relation to esophageal cancer; 23-year follow-up of two million Norwegian men and women. Cancer Causes Control. 2004;15(8):837-43.
Engeland, A., Tretli, S., & Bjørge, T. (2004). Height and body mass index in relation to esophageal cancer; 23-year follow-up of two million Norwegian men and women. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 15(8), pp. 837-43.
Engeland A, Tretli S, Bjørge T. Height and Body Mass Index in Relation to Esophageal Cancer; 23-year Follow-up of Two Million Norwegian Men and Women. Cancer Causes Control. 2004;15(8):837-43. PubMed PMID: 15456997.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Height and body mass index in relation to esophageal cancer; 23-year follow-up of two million Norwegian men and women. AU - Engeland,Anders, AU - Tretli,Steinar, AU - Bjørge,Tone, PY - 2004/10/1/pubmed PY - 2005/2/8/medline PY - 2004/10/1/entrez SP - 837 EP - 43 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 15 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Associations between body mass index (BMI) and stature and cancers at different sites have been explored in a number of studies. For esophageal cancer there seems to be different effects of BMI for different histological subtypes. We explored these relations in a Norwegian cohort. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Height and weight were measured in 2 million Norwegians during 1963-2001. During follow-up, 2245 histologically verified esophageal cancer cases were registered. Relative risks (RR) of esophageal cancer were estimated using proportional Cox regression. RESULTS: Compared with normal weighted (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OA) was observed in overweight men (BMI 25-29 kg/m(2)): RR=1.80 (95% CI: 1.48-2.19) and in obese men (BMI > or =30 kg/m(2)): RR=2.58 (95% CI: 1.81-3.68). The corresponding risk estimates for women were RR=1.64 (95% CI: 1.08-2.49) and RR=2.06 (95% CI: 1.25-3.39). The opposite relation was observed for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). For overweight men the RR of OSCC was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.63-0.82) and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50-0.93) for obese. The corresponding RR estimates for women were 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42-0.65) and 0.43 (95% CI: 0.32-0.59). In addition, the lowest men had the highest risk of esophageal cancer in general. Adjustment for smoking did not change these relations. CONCLUSION: BMI had opposite relations to the two most common histological groups of esophageal cancer. While low BMI increased the risk of OSCC, high BMI increased the risk of OA. An increased risk of esophageal cancer was found in the lowest men. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15456997/Height_and_body_mass_index_in_relation_to_esophageal_cancer L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=15456997.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -