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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an Indian urban population.
Int J Cardiol. 2004 Nov; 97(2):257-61.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine prevalence of the metabolic syndrome using United States Adult Treatment Panel-3 (ATP-3) guidelines in an urban Indian population.

METHODS

Randomly selected adults >20 years were studied using stratified sampling. Target study sample was 1800 with population proportionate distribution (men 960, women 840). Evaluation of anthropometric variables, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipids was performed. Subjects (1123; response 62.4%) were examined, fasting blood samples were available in 1091 (532 men, 559 women) and analysed for prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Atherosclerosis risk factors were determined using the current guidelines. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed when any three of the following were present: central obesity, raised triglycerides >/=150 mg/dl (>/=1.7 mmol/l), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, blood pressure >/=130/>/=85 mm Hg, and diabetes or fasting glucose >110 mg/dl (>6.1 mmol/l). Intergroup comparisons were performed using t-test or chi-square test.

RESULTS

Metabolic syndrome was present in 345 (31.6%) subjects; prevalence was 122 (22.9%) in men and 223 (39.9%) in women (p<0.001); the age-adjusted prevalence was 24.9%, 18.4% in men and 30.9% in women. There was a significant age-related increase in its prevalence (Mantel-Haenzel chi(2) for trend p<0.05). Prevalence of components of metabolic syndrome in men and women was: central obesity (waist, men >102 cm, women >88 cm) in 116 (25.6%) and 246 (44.0%); low HDL cholesterol (men<40 mg/dl, <1.0 mmol/l), women<50 mg/dl, <1.3 mmol/l) in 292 (54.9%) and 504 (90.2%); high triglycerides >/=150 mg/dl (>/=1.7 mmol/l) in 172 (32.3%) and 160 (28.6%); and impaired fasting glucose or diabetes in 90 (16.9%) and 90 (16.1%). The prevalence of physical inactivity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia (>/=200 mg/dl, >/=5.2 mmol/l) and high LDL cholesterol (>/=130 mg/dl, >/=3.4 mmol/l) was greater in the metabolic syndrome group in both men and women (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an urban Indian population. Focus of cardiovascular prevention should be at this high-risk group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Monilek Hospital and Research Centre, Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur 302004, India. rajeevg@satyam.net.inNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15458693

Citation

Gupta, Rajeev, et al. "Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in an Indian Urban Population." International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 97, no. 2, 2004, pp. 257-61.
Gupta R, Deedwania PC, Gupta A, et al. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an Indian urban population. Int J Cardiol. 2004;97(2):257-61.
Gupta, R., Deedwania, P. C., Gupta, A., Rastogi, S., Panwar, R. B., & Kothari, K. (2004). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an Indian urban population. International Journal of Cardiology, 97(2), 257-61.
Gupta R, et al. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in an Indian Urban Population. Int J Cardiol. 2004;97(2):257-61. PubMed PMID: 15458693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an Indian urban population. AU - Gupta,Rajeev, AU - Deedwania,Prakash C, AU - Gupta,Arvind, AU - Rastogi,Shweta, AU - Panwar,Raja B, AU - Kothari,Kunal, PY - 2002/10/24/received PY - 2003/11/12/revised PY - 2003/11/17/accepted PY - 2004/10/2/pubmed PY - 2005/2/9/medline PY - 2004/10/2/entrez SP - 257 EP - 61 JF - International journal of cardiology JO - Int J Cardiol VL - 97 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence of the metabolic syndrome using United States Adult Treatment Panel-3 (ATP-3) guidelines in an urban Indian population. METHODS: Randomly selected adults >20 years were studied using stratified sampling. Target study sample was 1800 with population proportionate distribution (men 960, women 840). Evaluation of anthropometric variables, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipids was performed. Subjects (1123; response 62.4%) were examined, fasting blood samples were available in 1091 (532 men, 559 women) and analysed for prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Atherosclerosis risk factors were determined using the current guidelines. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed when any three of the following were present: central obesity, raised triglycerides >/=150 mg/dl (>/=1.7 mmol/l), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, blood pressure >/=130/>/=85 mm Hg, and diabetes or fasting glucose >110 mg/dl (>6.1 mmol/l). Intergroup comparisons were performed using t-test or chi-square test. RESULTS: Metabolic syndrome was present in 345 (31.6%) subjects; prevalence was 122 (22.9%) in men and 223 (39.9%) in women (p<0.001); the age-adjusted prevalence was 24.9%, 18.4% in men and 30.9% in women. There was a significant age-related increase in its prevalence (Mantel-Haenzel chi(2) for trend p<0.05). Prevalence of components of metabolic syndrome in men and women was: central obesity (waist, men >102 cm, women >88 cm) in 116 (25.6%) and 246 (44.0%); low HDL cholesterol (men<40 mg/dl, <1.0 mmol/l), women<50 mg/dl, <1.3 mmol/l) in 292 (54.9%) and 504 (90.2%); high triglycerides >/=150 mg/dl (>/=1.7 mmol/l) in 172 (32.3%) and 160 (28.6%); and impaired fasting glucose or diabetes in 90 (16.9%) and 90 (16.1%). The prevalence of physical inactivity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia (>/=200 mg/dl, >/=5.2 mmol/l) and high LDL cholesterol (>/=130 mg/dl, >/=3.4 mmol/l) was greater in the metabolic syndrome group in both men and women (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an urban Indian population. Focus of cardiovascular prevention should be at this high-risk group. SN - 0167-5273 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15458693/Prevalence_of_metabolic_syndrome_in_an_Indian_urban_population_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167527304000026 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -