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Risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal African-American women.
Curr Med Res Opin 2004; 20(10):1681-7CM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although postmenopausal African-American women are at lower risk for osteoporosis-related fractures compared with white women, fractures in African-American women are associated with significantly higher morbidity and mortality. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in this population is just as important as it is for other ethnic groups and worthy of the attention of physicians and healthcare organizations.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal African-American women.

DESIGN

This was a retrospective, case-control study in 201 postmenopausal African-American women at a community-based osteoporosis center. Spine and hip bone mineral density measurements were obtained by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Patient and family medical history, past and present pharmaceutical use, and dietary and exercise habits were collected using a patient self-administered questionnaire.

RESULTS

Using the manufacturer's African-American referent database, 56 women had osteoporosis, 99 had osteopenia, and 46 had normal bone mineral density. Risk factors more common in the osteoporotic group compared with the normal group included sedentary lifestyle (P < 0.03), family history of osteoporosis (P < 0.03), low body mass index (P < 0.05), and history of bilateral oophorectomy (P < 0.03). Polyarthritis was more prevalent in the normal versus the osteoporotic group (P < 0.001). In addition, premenopausal use of oral contraceptives (P < 0.005) and postmenopausal use of estrogen therapy (P < 0.05) were more common in the normal compared with the osteoporotic group.

CONCLUSIONS

Many risk factors for osteoporosis in African-American women are similar to those in white women and can aid in the selection of patients in need of bone density testing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Osteoporosis Center of Atlanta, Decatur, GA 30033, USA. gwoodson@mindspring.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15462702

Citation

Woodson, Grattan C.. "Risk Factors for Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal African-American Women." Current Medical Research and Opinion, vol. 20, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1681-7.
Woodson GC. Risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal African-American women. Curr Med Res Opin. 2004;20(10):1681-7.
Woodson, G. C. (2004). Risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal African-American women. Current Medical Research and Opinion, 20(10), pp. 1681-7.
Woodson GC. Risk Factors for Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal African-American Women. Curr Med Res Opin. 2004;20(10):1681-7. PubMed PMID: 15462702.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal African-American women. A1 - Woodson,Grattan C, PY - 2004/10/7/pubmed PY - 2005/2/8/medline PY - 2004/10/7/entrez SP - 1681 EP - 7 JF - Current medical research and opinion JO - Curr Med Res Opin VL - 20 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although postmenopausal African-American women are at lower risk for osteoporosis-related fractures compared with white women, fractures in African-American women are associated with significantly higher morbidity and mortality. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in this population is just as important as it is for other ethnic groups and worthy of the attention of physicians and healthcare organizations. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal African-American women. DESIGN: This was a retrospective, case-control study in 201 postmenopausal African-American women at a community-based osteoporosis center. Spine and hip bone mineral density measurements were obtained by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Patient and family medical history, past and present pharmaceutical use, and dietary and exercise habits were collected using a patient self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: Using the manufacturer's African-American referent database, 56 women had osteoporosis, 99 had osteopenia, and 46 had normal bone mineral density. Risk factors more common in the osteoporotic group compared with the normal group included sedentary lifestyle (P < 0.03), family history of osteoporosis (P < 0.03), low body mass index (P < 0.05), and history of bilateral oophorectomy (P < 0.03). Polyarthritis was more prevalent in the normal versus the osteoporotic group (P < 0.001). In addition, premenopausal use of oral contraceptives (P < 0.005) and postmenopausal use of estrogen therapy (P < 0.05) were more common in the normal compared with the osteoporotic group. CONCLUSIONS: Many risk factors for osteoporosis in African-American women are similar to those in white women and can aid in the selection of patients in need of bone density testing. SN - 0300-7995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15462702/full_citation L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1185/030079904X3285 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -