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Childhood asthma and passive smoking. Urinary cotinine as a biomarker of exposure.
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Mar; 145(3):594-9.AR

Abstract

To assess the relationship between passive smoking and asthma, we investigated (1) whether passive smoking was more prevalent among asthmatic than control children and (2) whether exposure to tobacco smoke was higher in acute asthma than in nonacute asthma. Three groups were recruited into a case-control study: 72 acute asthmatic children from the emergency room (ER), 35 nonacute asthmatic children from the asthma clinic, and 121 control children from the ER. Both questionnaire and urinary cotinine/creatinine ratio (CCR) were used to assess passive smoking. Levels of CCR greater than or equal to 30 ng/mg were used to identify children exposed at home. Mean CCR was also computed. Acute and nonacute asthmatic children had similar prevalences of passive smoking at home. Acute cases showed a higher mean CCR than nonacute cases, but this was not significant. In comparing all asthmatic to control children, smoking by the maternal caregiver was more prevalent among asthmatic children (odds ratio OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1, 3.4). This was confirmed by CCR greater than or equal to 30 ng/mg (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.04, 3.35) and by the difference in mean CCR (43.6 versus 25.8 ng/mg, p = 0.06). We conclude that smoking by the maternal caregiver is associated with clinically significant asthma in children. We could not show that it is a trigger of acute asthma attacks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1546840

Citation

Ehrlich, R, et al. "Childhood Asthma and Passive Smoking. Urinary Cotinine as a Biomarker of Exposure." The American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol. 145, no. 3, 1992, pp. 594-9.
Ehrlich R, Kattan M, Godbold J, et al. Childhood asthma and passive smoking. Urinary cotinine as a biomarker of exposure. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992;145(3):594-9.
Ehrlich, R., Kattan, M., Godbold, J., Saltzberg, D. S., Grimm, K. T., Landrigan, P. J., & Lilienfeld, D. E. (1992). Childhood asthma and passive smoking. Urinary cotinine as a biomarker of exposure. The American Review of Respiratory Disease, 145(3), 594-9.
Ehrlich R, et al. Childhood Asthma and Passive Smoking. Urinary Cotinine as a Biomarker of Exposure. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992;145(3):594-9. PubMed PMID: 1546840.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood asthma and passive smoking. Urinary cotinine as a biomarker of exposure. AU - Ehrlich,R, AU - Kattan,M, AU - Godbold,J, AU - Saltzberg,D S, AU - Grimm,K T, AU - Landrigan,P J, AU - Lilienfeld,D E, PY - 1992/3/1/pubmed PY - 1992/3/1/medline PY - 1992/3/1/entrez SP - 594 EP - 9 JF - The American review of respiratory disease JO - Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. VL - 145 IS - 3 N2 - To assess the relationship between passive smoking and asthma, we investigated (1) whether passive smoking was more prevalent among asthmatic than control children and (2) whether exposure to tobacco smoke was higher in acute asthma than in nonacute asthma. Three groups were recruited into a case-control study: 72 acute asthmatic children from the emergency room (ER), 35 nonacute asthmatic children from the asthma clinic, and 121 control children from the ER. Both questionnaire and urinary cotinine/creatinine ratio (CCR) were used to assess passive smoking. Levels of CCR greater than or equal to 30 ng/mg were used to identify children exposed at home. Mean CCR was also computed. Acute and nonacute asthmatic children had similar prevalences of passive smoking at home. Acute cases showed a higher mean CCR than nonacute cases, but this was not significant. In comparing all asthmatic to control children, smoking by the maternal caregiver was more prevalent among asthmatic children (odds ratio OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.1, 3.4). This was confirmed by CCR greater than or equal to 30 ng/mg (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.04, 3.35) and by the difference in mean CCR (43.6 versus 25.8 ng/mg, p = 0.06). We conclude that smoking by the maternal caregiver is associated with clinically significant asthma in children. We could not show that it is a trigger of acute asthma attacks. SN - 0003-0805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1546840/Childhood_asthma_and_passive_smoking__Urinary_cotinine_as_a_biomarker_of_exposure_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm/145.3.594?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -