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Ovarian cancer: the neglected diagnosis.
Mayo Clin Proc 2004; 79(10):1277-82MC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate presenting signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer and stage of tumor in a community cohort of women with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of all women who sought primary and specialty care in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1997, to evaluate presenting symptoms, time from first symptom to diagnosis of ovarian cancer, and stage of tumor at diagnosis.

RESULTS

Of 107 women with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the most commonly documented presenting symptom was crampy abdominal pain. Urinary symptoms and abdominal pain were the most commonly documented presenting symptom in patients with stage I and II ovarian cancers, whereas abdominal pain and increased abdominal girth were the most commonly documented symptoms in patients with stage III and IV cancer. Approximately 15% of tumors (n = 15) were found during routine evaluations or during a procedure for another problem. Less than 25% of presenting symptoms (n = 24 women) related directly to the pelvis or were more traditional gynecologic symptoms. Delays in women seeking medical care, health care system issues, competing medical conditions, physicians' failure to follow up, and women not returning for follow-up were associated with longer time to diagnosis.

CONCLUSION

Both stage I and II cancer are associated with symptoms, but few symptoms are directly related to the reproductive pelvic organs or unique to ovarian cancer. A longer interval from first sign or symptom to diagnosis of ovarian cancer is associated with both patient and health care system factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Research, Olmsted Medical Center, 210 Ninth St SE, Rochester, MN 55904, USA. yawnx002@umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15473410

Citation

Yawn, Barbara P., et al. "Ovarian Cancer: the Neglected Diagnosis." Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 79, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1277-82.
Yawn BP, Barrette BA, Wollan PC. Ovarian cancer: the neglected diagnosis. Mayo Clin Proc. 2004;79(10):1277-82.
Yawn, B. P., Barrette, B. A., & Wollan, P. C. (2004). Ovarian cancer: the neglected diagnosis. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 79(10), pp. 1277-82.
Yawn BP, Barrette BA, Wollan PC. Ovarian Cancer: the Neglected Diagnosis. Mayo Clin Proc. 2004;79(10):1277-82. PubMed PMID: 15473410.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ovarian cancer: the neglected diagnosis. AU - Yawn,Barbara P, AU - Barrette,Brigitte A, AU - Wollan,Peter C, PY - 2004/10/12/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/12/entrez SP - 1277 EP - 82 JF - Mayo Clinic proceedings JO - Mayo Clin. Proc. VL - 79 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate presenting signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer and stage of tumor in a community cohort of women with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of all women who sought primary and specialty care in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1997, to evaluate presenting symptoms, time from first symptom to diagnosis of ovarian cancer, and stage of tumor at diagnosis. RESULTS: Of 107 women with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the most commonly documented presenting symptom was crampy abdominal pain. Urinary symptoms and abdominal pain were the most commonly documented presenting symptom in patients with stage I and II ovarian cancers, whereas abdominal pain and increased abdominal girth were the most commonly documented symptoms in patients with stage III and IV cancer. Approximately 15% of tumors (n = 15) were found during routine evaluations or during a procedure for another problem. Less than 25% of presenting symptoms (n = 24 women) related directly to the pelvis or were more traditional gynecologic symptoms. Delays in women seeking medical care, health care system issues, competing medical conditions, physicians' failure to follow up, and women not returning for follow-up were associated with longer time to diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Both stage I and II cancer are associated with symptoms, but few symptoms are directly related to the reproductive pelvic organs or unique to ovarian cancer. A longer interval from first sign or symptom to diagnosis of ovarian cancer is associated with both patient and health care system factors. SN - 0025-6196 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15473410/Ovarian_cancer:_the_neglected_diagnosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0025-6196(11)62663-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -