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Acculturation and physical activity among North Carolina Latina immigrants.
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Dec; 59(12):2509-22.SS

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the association between acculturation and physical activity among first generation Latina (Hispanic women) immigrants living in North Carolina. As part of the multi-site Women's Cardiovascular Health Network, 671 first generation Latina immigrants 20-50 years of age completed in-person interviews on physical activity, acculturation (measured by a language scale, length of residence in the US, and age at arrival in the US) and other potential individual and contextual correlates of physical activity. All statistical models were adjusted for age, general health, number of children in the home, marital status, and education, with self-reported physical activity as the dependent variable. Among participants, 37.4% met recommendations for physical activity, 41.9% reported insufficient activity, and 20.7% reported no moderate or vigorous activity. Latinas with higher English language acculturation were more likely to be physically active than women with lower English language acculturation. Likewise, women who arrived to the US when they were younger than 25 years were more likely to be physically active than women who arrived when they were 25 years or older. Length of residence in the US was not associated with physical activity. These relationships persisted when restricting the sample to Mexican born women. We conclude that among first generation immigrants living in North Carolina, those with higher English language acculturation or who arrived to the US at younger ages were more likely to report being physically active. These findings suggest that future epidemiologic studies and physical activity interventions should measure and tailor programs based on English-language use and age of arrival to the US among Latina immigrants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7435, USA. kelly_evenson@unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15474205

Citation

Evenson, Kelly R., et al. "Acculturation and Physical Activity Among North Carolina Latina Immigrants." Social Science & Medicine (1982), vol. 59, no. 12, 2004, pp. 2509-22.
Evenson KR, Sarmiento OL, Ayala GX. Acculturation and physical activity among North Carolina Latina immigrants. Soc Sci Med. 2004;59(12):2509-22.
Evenson, K. R., Sarmiento, O. L., & Ayala, G. X. (2004). Acculturation and physical activity among North Carolina Latina immigrants. Social Science & Medicine (1982), 59(12), 2509-22.
Evenson KR, Sarmiento OL, Ayala GX. Acculturation and Physical Activity Among North Carolina Latina Immigrants. Soc Sci Med. 2004;59(12):2509-22. PubMed PMID: 15474205.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acculturation and physical activity among North Carolina Latina immigrants. AU - Evenson,Kelly R, AU - Sarmiento,Olga L, AU - Ayala,Guadalupe X, PY - 2004/10/12/pubmed PY - 2005/2/19/medline PY - 2004/10/12/entrez SP - 2509 EP - 22 JF - Social science & medicine (1982) JO - Soc Sci Med VL - 59 IS - 12 N2 - The objective of this study was to examine the association between acculturation and physical activity among first generation Latina (Hispanic women) immigrants living in North Carolina. As part of the multi-site Women's Cardiovascular Health Network, 671 first generation Latina immigrants 20-50 years of age completed in-person interviews on physical activity, acculturation (measured by a language scale, length of residence in the US, and age at arrival in the US) and other potential individual and contextual correlates of physical activity. All statistical models were adjusted for age, general health, number of children in the home, marital status, and education, with self-reported physical activity as the dependent variable. Among participants, 37.4% met recommendations for physical activity, 41.9% reported insufficient activity, and 20.7% reported no moderate or vigorous activity. Latinas with higher English language acculturation were more likely to be physically active than women with lower English language acculturation. Likewise, women who arrived to the US when they were younger than 25 years were more likely to be physically active than women who arrived when they were 25 years or older. Length of residence in the US was not associated with physical activity. These relationships persisted when restricting the sample to Mexican born women. We conclude that among first generation immigrants living in North Carolina, those with higher English language acculturation or who arrived to the US at younger ages were more likely to report being physically active. These findings suggest that future epidemiologic studies and physical activity interventions should measure and tailor programs based on English-language use and age of arrival to the US among Latina immigrants. SN - 0277-9536 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15474205/Acculturation_and_physical_activity_among_North_Carolina_Latina_immigrants_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0277953604001911 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -