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The early light-inducible protein (ELIP) gene is expressed during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition in ripening tomato fruit.
J Exp Bot. 2004 Dec; 55(408):2541-8.JE

Abstract

Chloroplast-to-chromoplast transitions during fruit ripening require massive transformation of the plastid internal membrane structure as the photosynthetic apparatus is disassembled. Early Light-Inducible Proteins (ELIPs) are known to accumulate in chloroplasts during thylakoid biogenesis and under stressful conditions. To determine if ELIP may also play a role in thylakoid disassembly during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition, ELIP mRNA expression was measured in tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Rutgers. An EST clone was identified in the Tomato Genome Project/Solanaceae Genomics Network database that has high sequence similarity with the amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis ELIP1 and ELIP2. It has complete identity in the two conserved regions of the protein. Genomic Southern blots indicate that the gene is a single copy in tomato. The genomic sequence shows the three-exon structure typical of ELIP sequences from other species. mRNA for this gene is barely detectable on northern blots from etiolated seedlings, but transiently accumulates to high levels 2 h after transfer to the light. Greenhouse-grown tomatoes were used to measure ELIP mRNA accumulation during fruit development and ripening. Tomato ELIP mRNA is detectable in all stages of fruit ripening, but is most abundant in the breaker/turning stage of development. A survey of tomato EST databases revealed that ELIP cDNA is also relatively abundant in developing flowers, which contain yellow chromoplasts. Combined, these results suggest that ELIP may play a newly-recognized role in the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition process.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15475376

Citation

Bruno, Arianna K., and Carolyn M. Wetzel. "The Early Light-inducible Protein (ELIP) Gene Is Expressed During the Chloroplast-to-chromoplast Transition in Ripening Tomato Fruit." Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 55, no. 408, 2004, pp. 2541-8.
Bruno AK, Wetzel CM. The early light-inducible protein (ELIP) gene is expressed during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition in ripening tomato fruit. J Exp Bot. 2004;55(408):2541-8.
Bruno, A. K., & Wetzel, C. M. (2004). The early light-inducible protein (ELIP) gene is expressed during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition in ripening tomato fruit. Journal of Experimental Botany, 55(408), 2541-8.
Bruno AK, Wetzel CM. The Early Light-inducible Protein (ELIP) Gene Is Expressed During the Chloroplast-to-chromoplast Transition in Ripening Tomato Fruit. J Exp Bot. 2004;55(408):2541-8. PubMed PMID: 15475376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The early light-inducible protein (ELIP) gene is expressed during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition in ripening tomato fruit. AU - Bruno,Arianna K, AU - Wetzel,Carolyn M, Y1 - 2004/10/08/ PY - 2004/10/12/pubmed PY - 2005/2/4/medline PY - 2004/10/12/entrez SP - 2541 EP - 8 JF - Journal of experimental botany JO - J Exp Bot VL - 55 IS - 408 N2 - Chloroplast-to-chromoplast transitions during fruit ripening require massive transformation of the plastid internal membrane structure as the photosynthetic apparatus is disassembled. Early Light-Inducible Proteins (ELIPs) are known to accumulate in chloroplasts during thylakoid biogenesis and under stressful conditions. To determine if ELIP may also play a role in thylakoid disassembly during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition, ELIP mRNA expression was measured in tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Rutgers. An EST clone was identified in the Tomato Genome Project/Solanaceae Genomics Network database that has high sequence similarity with the amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis ELIP1 and ELIP2. It has complete identity in the two conserved regions of the protein. Genomic Southern blots indicate that the gene is a single copy in tomato. The genomic sequence shows the three-exon structure typical of ELIP sequences from other species. mRNA for this gene is barely detectable on northern blots from etiolated seedlings, but transiently accumulates to high levels 2 h after transfer to the light. Greenhouse-grown tomatoes were used to measure ELIP mRNA accumulation during fruit development and ripening. Tomato ELIP mRNA is detectable in all stages of fruit ripening, but is most abundant in the breaker/turning stage of development. A survey of tomato EST databases revealed that ELIP cDNA is also relatively abundant in developing flowers, which contain yellow chromoplasts. Combined, these results suggest that ELIP may play a newly-recognized role in the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition process. SN - 0022-0957 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15475376/The_early_light_inducible_protein__ELIP__gene_is_expressed_during_the_chloroplast_to_chromoplast_transition_in_ripening_tomato_fruit_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jxb/erh273 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -