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Alcohol and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: a cohort study.
Arch Intern Med. 2004 Oct 11; 164(18):1993-8.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The evidence for an association between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation is conflicting.

METHODS

We prospectively examined the association between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (mean age, 56 years) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. The consumption of alcohol was analyzed as sex-specific quintiles by Cox proportional hazards regression models.

RESULTS

The mean +/- SD consumption of alcohol per day was 28.2 +/- 25 g in men and 13.9 +/- 15 g in women. During follow-up (mean, 5.7 years), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 556 subjects (374 men and 182 women). After adjusting for established risk factors, there was a modest increase in risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter by increasing alcohol consumption in men. When using the lowest quintile of alcohol consumption in men as a reference, the adjusted hazard rate ratios in men in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.04, 1.44, 1.25, and 1.46, respectively (P for trend, .04). When using the lowest quintile of alcohol consumption in women as a reference, the adjusted hazard rate ratios in women in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.09, 1.27, 1.23, and 1.14, respectively (P for trend, .69). Inclusion of information on the frequency of alcohol consumption and the preferred source of alcohol did not change these associations.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of alcohol was associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in men. In women, moderate consumption of alcohol did not seem to be associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. lars.frost@aas.auh.dkNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15477433

Citation

Frost, Lars, and Peter Vestergaard. "Alcohol and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation or Flutter: a Cohort Study." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 164, no. 18, 2004, pp. 1993-8.
Frost L, Vestergaard P. Alcohol and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: a cohort study. Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(18):1993-8.
Frost, L., & Vestergaard, P. (2004). Alcohol and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: a cohort study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 164(18), 1993-8.
Frost L, Vestergaard P. Alcohol and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation or Flutter: a Cohort Study. Arch Intern Med. 2004 Oct 11;164(18):1993-8. PubMed PMID: 15477433.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: a cohort study. AU - Frost,Lars, AU - Vestergaard,Peter, PY - 2004/10/13/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/13/entrez SP - 1993 EP - 8 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 164 IS - 18 N2 - BACKGROUND: The evidence for an association between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation is conflicting. METHODS: We prospectively examined the association between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (mean age, 56 years) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. The consumption of alcohol was analyzed as sex-specific quintiles by Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: The mean +/- SD consumption of alcohol per day was 28.2 +/- 25 g in men and 13.9 +/- 15 g in women. During follow-up (mean, 5.7 years), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 556 subjects (374 men and 182 women). After adjusting for established risk factors, there was a modest increase in risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter by increasing alcohol consumption in men. When using the lowest quintile of alcohol consumption in men as a reference, the adjusted hazard rate ratios in men in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.04, 1.44, 1.25, and 1.46, respectively (P for trend, .04). When using the lowest quintile of alcohol consumption in women as a reference, the adjusted hazard rate ratios in women in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.09, 1.27, 1.23, and 1.14, respectively (P for trend, .69). Inclusion of information on the frequency of alcohol consumption and the preferred source of alcohol did not change these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of alcohol was associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in men. In women, moderate consumption of alcohol did not seem to be associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15477433/Alcohol_and_risk_of_atrial_fibrillation_or_flutter:_a_cohort_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.164.18.1993 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -