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Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and human herpesvirus 6 active infection.
Arch Neurol 2004; 61(10):1523-7AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent studies have focused on the relationship between human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and multiple sclerosis (MS).

OBJECTIVE

To analyze HHV-6 messenger RNA expression in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) MS vs healthy blood donors (HBDs).

DESIGN

One hundred fifty-four subjects were enrolled in the study: 105 patients with RRMS (32 in relapse) and 49 HBDs. Total DNA and messenger RNA were extracted from serum and blood samples, respectively, and analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for the detection of 3 HHV-6 immediate-early genes (U16/U17,U89/U90, and U94) and both HHV-6 variants (HHV-6A and HHV-6B).

RESULTS

Active HHV-6 infection was detected in 16% of patients with RRMS vs 0% of HBDs (P = .003). Seven patients with RRMS with exacerbation had HHV-6 active replication, and the virus remained latent in only 1 of them. We did not find any statistically significant difference between HHV-6 active or latent infection for patients in remission (P = .12). Among patients with RRMS with HHV-6 active replication, viral load was higher when they experienced an acute attack than when in remission (P = .04). In those patients with RRMS who had an active infection only, HHV-6A was found. Cell-free HHV-6 DNA detected in serum samples confirmed the results.

CONCLUSIONS

The results show that a subset of patients with RRMS experience HHV-6 active infection, and there likely is an association between the viral active replication and relapses; therefore, HHV-6 active infection may imply a greater risk of exacerbations in a subgroup of patients with RRMS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servicio de Neurología, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, 28040 Madrid, Spain. labesmul@hcsc.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15477505

Citation

Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto, et al. "Relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis and Human Herpesvirus 6 Active Infection." Archives of Neurology, vol. 61, no. 10, 2004, pp. 1523-7.
Alvarez-Lafuente R, De las Heras V, Bartolomé M, et al. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and human herpesvirus 6 active infection. Arch Neurol. 2004;61(10):1523-7.
Alvarez-Lafuente, R., De las Heras, V., Bartolomé, M., Picazo, J. J., & Arroyo, R. (2004). Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and human herpesvirus 6 active infection. Archives of Neurology, 61(10), pp. 1523-7.
Alvarez-Lafuente R, et al. Relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis and Human Herpesvirus 6 Active Infection. Arch Neurol. 2004;61(10):1523-7. PubMed PMID: 15477505.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and human herpesvirus 6 active infection. AU - Alvarez-Lafuente,Roberto, AU - De las Heras,Virginia, AU - Bartolomé,Manuel, AU - Picazo,Juan José, AU - Arroyo,Rafael, PY - 2004/10/13/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/13/entrez SP - 1523 EP - 7 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch. Neurol. VL - 61 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent studies have focused on the relationship between human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: To analyze HHV-6 messenger RNA expression in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) MS vs healthy blood donors (HBDs). DESIGN: One hundred fifty-four subjects were enrolled in the study: 105 patients with RRMS (32 in relapse) and 49 HBDs. Total DNA and messenger RNA were extracted from serum and blood samples, respectively, and analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for the detection of 3 HHV-6 immediate-early genes (U16/U17,U89/U90, and U94) and both HHV-6 variants (HHV-6A and HHV-6B). RESULTS: Active HHV-6 infection was detected in 16% of patients with RRMS vs 0% of HBDs (P = .003). Seven patients with RRMS with exacerbation had HHV-6 active replication, and the virus remained latent in only 1 of them. We did not find any statistically significant difference between HHV-6 active or latent infection for patients in remission (P = .12). Among patients with RRMS with HHV-6 active replication, viral load was higher when they experienced an acute attack than when in remission (P = .04). In those patients with RRMS who had an active infection only, HHV-6A was found. Cell-free HHV-6 DNA detected in serum samples confirmed the results. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that a subset of patients with RRMS experience HHV-6 active infection, and there likely is an association between the viral active replication and relapses; therefore, HHV-6 active infection may imply a greater risk of exacerbations in a subgroup of patients with RRMS. SN - 0003-9942 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15477505/Relapsing_remitting_multiple_sclerosis_and_human_herpesvirus_6_active_infection_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/10.1001/archneur.61.10.1523 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -