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Manual versus target-controlled infusions of propofol.
Anaesthesia. 2004 Nov; 59(11):1059-63.A

Abstract

Target-controlled infusion systems have been shown to result in the administration of larger doses of propofol, which may result in delayed emergence and recovery from anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to investigate if this was due to a difference in the depth of hypnosis (using the bispectral index monitoring) between the manual and target controlled systems of administration. Fifty unpremedicated patients undergoing elective surgery were randomly allocated to have their anaesthesia maintained with manual or target-controlled propofol infusion schemes. In both groups, the rate of propofol administration was adjusted according to standard clinical criteria while bispectral index scores were recorded by an observer not involved in the delivery of anaesthesia. The total dose of propofol used was higher in the target controlled group (mean 9.9 [standard deviation 1.6] compared with 8.1 [1.0] mg.kg(-1).h(-1) in the manual group [p < 0.0001]). The times to emergence and recovery end-points were comparable between the two groups. The difference in the total dosage of propofol was mainly due to higher rate of propofol administration in the first 30 min in the target controlled infusion group. The bispectral index scores were lower in the target controlled group during this time, being significantly so over the first 15 min of anaesthesia. We conclude that propofol administration by a target controlled infusion system results in the administration of higher doses of propofol and lower bispectral index values mainly in the initial period of anaesthesia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anaesthetics and Intensive Care Medicine, The Queen's University of Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15479311

Citation

Breslin, D S., et al. "Manual Versus Target-controlled Infusions of Propofol." Anaesthesia, vol. 59, no. 11, 2004, pp. 1059-63.
Breslin DS, Mirakhur RK, Reid JE, et al. Manual versus target-controlled infusions of propofol. Anaesthesia. 2004;59(11):1059-63.
Breslin, D. S., Mirakhur, R. K., Reid, J. E., & Kyle, A. (2004). Manual versus target-controlled infusions of propofol. Anaesthesia, 59(11), 1059-63.
Breslin DS, et al. Manual Versus Target-controlled Infusions of Propofol. Anaesthesia. 2004;59(11):1059-63. PubMed PMID: 15479311.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Manual versus target-controlled infusions of propofol. AU - Breslin,D S, AU - Mirakhur,R K, AU - Reid,J E, AU - Kyle,A, PY - 2004/10/14/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/14/entrez SP - 1059 EP - 63 JF - Anaesthesia JO - Anaesthesia VL - 59 IS - 11 N2 - Target-controlled infusion systems have been shown to result in the administration of larger doses of propofol, which may result in delayed emergence and recovery from anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to investigate if this was due to a difference in the depth of hypnosis (using the bispectral index monitoring) between the manual and target controlled systems of administration. Fifty unpremedicated patients undergoing elective surgery were randomly allocated to have their anaesthesia maintained with manual or target-controlled propofol infusion schemes. In both groups, the rate of propofol administration was adjusted according to standard clinical criteria while bispectral index scores were recorded by an observer not involved in the delivery of anaesthesia. The total dose of propofol used was higher in the target controlled group (mean 9.9 [standard deviation 1.6] compared with 8.1 [1.0] mg.kg(-1).h(-1) in the manual group [p < 0.0001]). The times to emergence and recovery end-points were comparable between the two groups. The difference in the total dosage of propofol was mainly due to higher rate of propofol administration in the first 30 min in the target controlled infusion group. The bispectral index scores were lower in the target controlled group during this time, being significantly so over the first 15 min of anaesthesia. We conclude that propofol administration by a target controlled infusion system results in the administration of higher doses of propofol and lower bispectral index values mainly in the initial period of anaesthesia. SN - 0003-2409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15479311/Manual_versus_target_controlled_infusions_of_propofol_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0003-2409&amp;date=2004&amp;volume=59&amp;issue=11&amp;spage=1059 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -