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Impact of executive function deficits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on academic outcomes in children.
J Consult Clin Psychol. 2004 Oct; 72(5):757-66.JC

Abstract

The association between executive function deficits (EFDs) and functional outcomes were examined among children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants were children and adolescents with (n = 259) and without (n = 222) ADHD, as ascertained from pediatric and psychiatric clinics. The authors defined EFD as at least 2 executive function measures impaired. Significantly more children and adolescents with ADHD had EFDs than did control participants. ADHD with EFDs was associated with an increased risk for grade retention and a decrease in academic achievement relative to (a) ADHD alone, (b) controlled socioeconomic status, (c) learning disabilities, and (d) IQ. No differences were noted in social functioning or psychiatric comorbidity. Children and adolescents with ADHD and EFDs were found to be at high risk for significant impairments in academic functioning. These results support screening children with ADHD for EFDs to prevent academic failure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unit, Psychiatry Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. jbiederman@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15482034

Citation

Biederman, Joseph, et al. "Impact of Executive Function Deficits and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) On Academic Outcomes in Children." Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 72, no. 5, 2004, pp. 757-66.
Biederman J, Monuteaux MC, Doyle AE, et al. Impact of executive function deficits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on academic outcomes in children. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2004;72(5):757-66.
Biederman, J., Monuteaux, M. C., Doyle, A. E., Seidman, L. J., Wilens, T. E., Ferrero, F., Morgan, C. L., & Faraone, S. V. (2004). Impact of executive function deficits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on academic outcomes in children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72(5), 757-66.
Biederman J, et al. Impact of Executive Function Deficits and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) On Academic Outcomes in Children. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2004;72(5):757-66. PubMed PMID: 15482034.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of executive function deficits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on academic outcomes in children. AU - Biederman,Joseph, AU - Monuteaux,Michael C, AU - Doyle,Alysa E, AU - Seidman,Larry J, AU - Wilens,Timothy E, AU - Ferrero,Frances, AU - Morgan,Christie L, AU - Faraone,Stephen V, PY - 2004/10/16/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/16/entrez SP - 757 EP - 66 JF - Journal of consulting and clinical psychology JO - J Consult Clin Psychol VL - 72 IS - 5 N2 - The association between executive function deficits (EFDs) and functional outcomes were examined among children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants were children and adolescents with (n = 259) and without (n = 222) ADHD, as ascertained from pediatric and psychiatric clinics. The authors defined EFD as at least 2 executive function measures impaired. Significantly more children and adolescents with ADHD had EFDs than did control participants. ADHD with EFDs was associated with an increased risk for grade retention and a decrease in academic achievement relative to (a) ADHD alone, (b) controlled socioeconomic status, (c) learning disabilities, and (d) IQ. No differences were noted in social functioning or psychiatric comorbidity. Children and adolescents with ADHD and EFDs were found to be at high risk for significant impairments in academic functioning. These results support screening children with ADHD for EFDs to prevent academic failure. SN - 0022-006X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15482034/Impact_of_executive_function_deficits_and_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder__ADHD__on_academic_outcomes_in_children_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/ccp/72/5/757 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -