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Effect of dietary organic versus inorganic selenium in laying hens on the productivity, selenium distribution in egg and selenium content in blood, liver and kidney.
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2004; 18(1):65-8.JT

Abstract

We investigated the effect of organic versus inorganic dietary selenium in laying hens on the productivity, selenium distribution in egg and selenium content in blood, liver and kidney. Sixty Leghorn laying hens were fed a basic diet containing 0.23mg Se/kg DM (dry matter) for 2 weeks and then were allocated randomly into three groups. Thereafter, the hens were given the same basic diet without supplementation, or with 0.51 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite (SS) or Se-malt (SM). During the experiment, egg rate and dietary intake were recorded, blood was sampled on days 10 and 20, and six eggs were sampled on days 8, 16 and 24 from each treatment group for Se content determination. At the end of the experiment, 10 hens from each treatment were slaughtered, and liver and kidney were sampled for the determination of Se content. The result showed that with the increase of dietary Se level, the Se content in egg, blood, liver and kidney was elevated (P < 0.05), but the hens' productivity was not affected. SS increased liver Se content more than SM (P < 0.05), while the Se content both in blood and kidney did not differ significantly between the SS and SM treatments. Se from SM and SS mainly deposited in the egg yolk. This suggests that the metabolic route of Se from SM is similar to that of Se from SS in laying hens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Hubei Province, Wuhan 430070, China. lijk210@sina.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15487765

Citation

Jiakui, Li, and Wang Xiaolong. "Effect of Dietary Organic Versus Inorganic Selenium in Laying Hens On the Productivity, Selenium Distribution in Egg and Selenium Content in Blood, Liver and Kidney." Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), vol. 18, no. 1, 2004, pp. 65-8.
Jiakui L, Xiaolong W. Effect of dietary organic versus inorganic selenium in laying hens on the productivity, selenium distribution in egg and selenium content in blood, liver and kidney. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2004;18(1):65-8.
Jiakui, L., & Xiaolong, W. (2004). Effect of dietary organic versus inorganic selenium in laying hens on the productivity, selenium distribution in egg and selenium content in blood, liver and kidney. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), 18(1), 65-8.
Jiakui L, Xiaolong W. Effect of Dietary Organic Versus Inorganic Selenium in Laying Hens On the Productivity, Selenium Distribution in Egg and Selenium Content in Blood, Liver and Kidney. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2004;18(1):65-8. PubMed PMID: 15487765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of dietary organic versus inorganic selenium in laying hens on the productivity, selenium distribution in egg and selenium content in blood, liver and kidney. AU - Jiakui,Li, AU - Xiaolong,Wang, PY - 2004/10/19/pubmed PY - 2005/2/3/medline PY - 2004/10/19/entrez SP - 65 EP - 8 JF - Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology : organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) JO - J Trace Elem Med Biol VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - We investigated the effect of organic versus inorganic dietary selenium in laying hens on the productivity, selenium distribution in egg and selenium content in blood, liver and kidney. Sixty Leghorn laying hens were fed a basic diet containing 0.23mg Se/kg DM (dry matter) for 2 weeks and then were allocated randomly into three groups. Thereafter, the hens were given the same basic diet without supplementation, or with 0.51 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite (SS) or Se-malt (SM). During the experiment, egg rate and dietary intake were recorded, blood was sampled on days 10 and 20, and six eggs were sampled on days 8, 16 and 24 from each treatment group for Se content determination. At the end of the experiment, 10 hens from each treatment were slaughtered, and liver and kidney were sampled for the determination of Se content. The result showed that with the increase of dietary Se level, the Se content in egg, blood, liver and kidney was elevated (P < 0.05), but the hens' productivity was not affected. SS increased liver Se content more than SM (P < 0.05), while the Se content both in blood and kidney did not differ significantly between the SS and SM treatments. Se from SM and SS mainly deposited in the egg yolk. This suggests that the metabolic route of Se from SM is similar to that of Se from SS in laying hens. SN - 0946-672X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15487765/Effect_of_dietary_organic_versus_inorganic_selenium_in_laying_hens_on_the_productivity_selenium_distribution_in_egg_and_selenium_content_in_blood_liver_and_kidney_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0946-672X(04)00004-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -