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The CpG island methylator phenotype is not associated with a personal or family history of cancer.
Cancer Res. 2004 Oct 15; 64(20):7618-21.CR

Abstract

Colorectal cancers with widespread CpG island methylation display a number of distinct clinicopathological features, and it has been suggested that the condition has an inheritable genetic component. To address this possibility, histories of cancer were obtained from 562 individuals undergoing curative surgery for unselected colorectal cancer at one institution. Microsatellite status and methylation at p16, MINT1, 2, 12, and 31 loci were determined on fresh tumor tissue using standard methods. Fifty-five of 562 probands in this study provided a personal history of at least one other colorectal cancer, 10 reported at least one extracolonic cancer of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer type, and 84 individuals had another type of cancer. Age was strongly associated with the risk of multiple cancers, but there was no evidence that microsatellite instability or the CpG island methylator phenotype were independent risk factors for their development, either in the colorectum or elsewhere. Of the 547 individuals with knowledge of their family history, 80 (14.6%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative, and 60% of individuals reported a history of any cancer in a first-degree relative. Neither tumor CpG island methylator phenotype status nor microsatellite instability was predictive of a positive history of cancer in first- or second-degree relatives. The probability of a positive family or personal history of cancer did not increase with increasing number of methylated loci. Epigenetic silencing of multiple genes seen in some tumors is at best rarely the result of an inherited defect in the methylation apparatus. There is no justification for altering the personal or family cancer screening recommendations on the basis of tumor CpG island methylator phenotype status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Oncology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. r.ward@garvan.unsw.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15492290

Citation

Ward, Robyn Lynne, et al. "The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype Is Not Associated With a Personal or Family History of Cancer." Cancer Research, vol. 64, no. 20, 2004, pp. 7618-21.
Ward RL, Williams R, Law M, et al. The CpG island methylator phenotype is not associated with a personal or family history of cancer. Cancer Res. 2004;64(20):7618-21.
Ward, R. L., Williams, R., Law, M., & Hawkins, N. J. (2004). The CpG island methylator phenotype is not associated with a personal or family history of cancer. Cancer Research, 64(20), 7618-21.
Ward RL, et al. The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype Is Not Associated With a Personal or Family History of Cancer. Cancer Res. 2004 Oct 15;64(20):7618-21. PubMed PMID: 15492290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The CpG island methylator phenotype is not associated with a personal or family history of cancer. AU - Ward,Robyn Lynne, AU - Williams,Rachel, AU - Law,Matthew, AU - Hawkins,Nicholas John, PY - 2004/10/20/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/20/entrez SP - 7618 EP - 21 JF - Cancer research JO - Cancer Res VL - 64 IS - 20 N2 - Colorectal cancers with widespread CpG island methylation display a number of distinct clinicopathological features, and it has been suggested that the condition has an inheritable genetic component. To address this possibility, histories of cancer were obtained from 562 individuals undergoing curative surgery for unselected colorectal cancer at one institution. Microsatellite status and methylation at p16, MINT1, 2, 12, and 31 loci were determined on fresh tumor tissue using standard methods. Fifty-five of 562 probands in this study provided a personal history of at least one other colorectal cancer, 10 reported at least one extracolonic cancer of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer type, and 84 individuals had another type of cancer. Age was strongly associated with the risk of multiple cancers, but there was no evidence that microsatellite instability or the CpG island methylator phenotype were independent risk factors for their development, either in the colorectum or elsewhere. Of the 547 individuals with knowledge of their family history, 80 (14.6%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative, and 60% of individuals reported a history of any cancer in a first-degree relative. Neither tumor CpG island methylator phenotype status nor microsatellite instability was predictive of a positive history of cancer in first- or second-degree relatives. The probability of a positive family or personal history of cancer did not increase with increasing number of methylated loci. Epigenetic silencing of multiple genes seen in some tumors is at best rarely the result of an inherited defect in the methylation apparatus. There is no justification for altering the personal or family cancer screening recommendations on the basis of tumor CpG island methylator phenotype status. SN - 0008-5472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15492290/The_CpG_island_methylator_phenotype_is_not_associated_with_a_personal_or_family_history_of_cancer_ L2 - http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15492290 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -