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Meningioma and schwannoma risk in adults in relation to family history of cancer.

Abstract

Relatively little is known about factors that contribute to the development of meningioma and vestibular schwannoma, two intracranial nervous system tumors. We evaluated the risk of these tumors in relation to family history of malignant or benign tumors. Incident cases of meningioma (n = 197) or schwannoma (n = 96) were identified at three U. S. referral hospitals between June 1994 and August 1998. Controls (n = 799) admitted to the same hospitals for nonmalignant conditions were matched to cases on age, sex, race/ethnicity, hospital, and proximity of residence to hospital. We found that risk of meningioma was increased among persons reporting a family history of a benign brain tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-21.0; n = 5) or melanoma (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.2-15.0; n 5). A family history of breast cancer was associated with an elevated meningioma risk among participants aged 18 to 49 years (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4-11.0; n = 8) but a reduced risk among older respondents (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7; n = 3). Family history of cancer did not differ between schwannoma cases and controls, although the statistical power to detect associations was limited. Some relative risk estimates were based on a small number of observations and may have arisen by chance. Inheritance of predisposing genes, shared environmental factors, or both within families with a history of benign brain tumors, melanoma, or possibly breast cancer may be related to altered meningioma risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. dhill@mail.nih.gov

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    Source

    Neuro-oncology 6:4 2004 Oct pg 274-80

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Brain Neoplasms
    Case-Control Studies
    Female
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Humans
    Male
    Meningeal Neoplasms
    Meningioma
    Middle Aged
    Neurilemmoma
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15494094

    Citation

    Hill, Deirdre A., et al. "Meningioma and Schwannoma Risk in Adults in Relation to Family History of Cancer." Neuro-oncology, vol. 6, no. 4, 2004, pp. 274-80.
    Hill DA, Linet MS, Black PM, et al. Meningioma and schwannoma risk in adults in relation to family history of cancer. Neuro-oncology. 2004;6(4):274-80.
    Hill, D. A., Linet, M. S., Black, P. M., Fine, H. A., Selker, R. G., Shapiro, W. R., & Inskip, P. D. (2004). Meningioma and schwannoma risk in adults in relation to family history of cancer. Neuro-oncology, 6(4), pp. 274-80.
    Hill DA, et al. Meningioma and Schwannoma Risk in Adults in Relation to Family History of Cancer. Neuro-oncology. 2004;6(4):274-80. PubMed PMID: 15494094.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Meningioma and schwannoma risk in adults in relation to family history of cancer. AU - Hill,Deirdre A, AU - Linet,Martha S, AU - Black,Peter M, AU - Fine,Howard A, AU - Selker,Robert G, AU - Shapiro,William R, AU - Inskip,Peter D, PY - 2004/10/21/pubmed PY - 2004/12/23/medline PY - 2004/10/21/entrez SP - 274 EP - 80 JF - Neuro-oncology JO - Neuro-oncology VL - 6 IS - 4 N2 - Relatively little is known about factors that contribute to the development of meningioma and vestibular schwannoma, two intracranial nervous system tumors. We evaluated the risk of these tumors in relation to family history of malignant or benign tumors. Incident cases of meningioma (n = 197) or schwannoma (n = 96) were identified at three U. S. referral hospitals between June 1994 and August 1998. Controls (n = 799) admitted to the same hospitals for nonmalignant conditions were matched to cases on age, sex, race/ethnicity, hospital, and proximity of residence to hospital. We found that risk of meningioma was increased among persons reporting a family history of a benign brain tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-21.0; n = 5) or melanoma (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.2-15.0; n 5). A family history of breast cancer was associated with an elevated meningioma risk among participants aged 18 to 49 years (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4-11.0; n = 8) but a reduced risk among older respondents (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7; n = 3). Family history of cancer did not differ between schwannoma cases and controls, although the statistical power to detect associations was limited. Some relative risk estimates were based on a small number of observations and may have arisen by chance. Inheritance of predisposing genes, shared environmental factors, or both within families with a history of benign brain tumors, melanoma, or possibly breast cancer may be related to altered meningioma risk. SN - 1522-8517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15494094/Meningioma_and_schwannoma_risk_in_adults_in_relation_to_family_history_of_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/neuro-oncology/article-lookup/doi/10.1215/S1152851704000109 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -