Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Healthy Eating Index and C-reactive protein concentration: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Feb; 59(2):278-83.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether diet quality is associated with C-reactive protein concentration.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994).

SETTING

Representative sample of the US population.

SUBJECTS

A total of 13 811 men and women aged >/=20 y.

INTERVENTIONS

We examined the cross-sectional associations between the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), a measure of diet quality according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and serum C-reactive protein concentration. Dietary information was assessed using a 24-h recall.

RESULTS

After adjustment for age, sex, race or ethnicity, education, smoking status, cotinine concentration, body mass index, waist-hip-ratio, aspirin use, alcohol use, physical activity level, and energy intake, HEI score was inversely associated with an elevated C-reactive protein concentration in logistic regression analysis (odds ratio per 10 unit change: 0.92; 95th confidence interval (CI): 0.86-0.99). Among the components, only the score for grain consumption was inversely associated with an elevated C-reactive protein concentration. Compared with participants in the lowest quintile of number of servings of grain consumption, the adjusted odds ratios of having an elevated C-reactive protein concentration for participants in the second, third, fourth, and fifth quintiles were 0.87 (95th CI: 0.67, 1.12), 0.85 (95th CI: 0.69, 1.06), 0.79 (95th CI: 0.65, 0.96), and 0.68 (95th CI: 0.52, 0.88), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Grain consumption may reduce inflammation. Our findings require confirmation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. eford@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15494735

Citation

Ford, E S., et al. "Healthy Eating Index and C-reactive Protein Concentration: Findings From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 2, 2005, pp. 278-83.
Ford ES, Mokdad AH, Liu S. Healthy Eating Index and C-reactive protein concentration: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(2):278-83.
Ford, E. S., Mokdad, A. H., & Liu, S. (2005). Healthy Eating Index and C-reactive protein concentration: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(2), 278-83.
Ford ES, Mokdad AH, Liu S. Healthy Eating Index and C-reactive Protein Concentration: Findings From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(2):278-83. PubMed PMID: 15494735.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Healthy Eating Index and C-reactive protein concentration: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. AU - Ford,E S, AU - Mokdad,A H, AU - Liu,S, PY - 2004/10/21/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2004/10/21/entrez SP - 278 EP - 83 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 59 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine whether diet quality is associated with C-reactive protein concentration. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994). SETTING: Representative sample of the US population. SUBJECTS: A total of 13 811 men and women aged >/=20 y. INTERVENTIONS: We examined the cross-sectional associations between the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), a measure of diet quality according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and serum C-reactive protein concentration. Dietary information was assessed using a 24-h recall. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, race or ethnicity, education, smoking status, cotinine concentration, body mass index, waist-hip-ratio, aspirin use, alcohol use, physical activity level, and energy intake, HEI score was inversely associated with an elevated C-reactive protein concentration in logistic regression analysis (odds ratio per 10 unit change: 0.92; 95th confidence interval (CI): 0.86-0.99). Among the components, only the score for grain consumption was inversely associated with an elevated C-reactive protein concentration. Compared with participants in the lowest quintile of number of servings of grain consumption, the adjusted odds ratios of having an elevated C-reactive protein concentration for participants in the second, third, fourth, and fifth quintiles were 0.87 (95th CI: 0.67, 1.12), 0.85 (95th CI: 0.69, 1.06), 0.79 (95th CI: 0.65, 0.96), and 0.68 (95th CI: 0.52, 0.88), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Grain consumption may reduce inflammation. Our findings require confirmation. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15494735/Healthy_Eating_Index_and_C_reactive_protein_concentration:_findings_from_the_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_III_1988_1994_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602070 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -