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Ethnic differences in the prevalence of overweight among young children in Hawaii.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To compare the prevalence of overweight among young children of different ethnic backgrounds and describe the age pattern of overweight in early childhood.

METHODS

Cross-sectional study of 21,911 children, 12 to 59 months old, participating in the Hawaii Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children in 1997-1998. They were grouped in eight ethnic categories. For 1-year-olds we defined overweight as weight-for-age at the 95th percentile or more and underweight as weight-for-age at less than the 10th percentile. For 2- to 4-year-olds overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) at the 95th percentile or more, underweight as BMI less than 10th percentile, tall stature as height-for-age at the 95th percentile or more, and short stature as height-for-age at less than the 10th percentile. The National Center for Health Statistics 2000 growth charts were the reference values. The analysis included bivariate and multivariate methods.

RESULTS

Large differences were found among ethnic groups. Among 1-year-olds, Samoans were the heaviest (17.5% overweight) and Filipinos the lightest (30.2% underweight). Among 2- to 4-year-olds, Samoans were the heaviest (27.0% overweight) and the tallest (16.9% tall), whereas Asians were the lightest (12.2% underweight), and Filipinos the shortest (19.0% short). Hawaiians and Asians also had a high percentage of short children (13.6% and 12.2%, respectively). Prevalence of overweight in all 2- to 4-year-olds was more than the expected 5%, especially for Samoans, Filipinos, Hawaiians, and Asians. At age 2 to 4 years, overweight was almost twice as prevalent as at age 1. Multivariate analysis showed that ethnicity (Samoan) had the strongest independent association with weight-for-age percentile, BMI, and overweight in the two age groups, followed by birth weight.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first study of overweight among children of Asian and Pacific Island backgrounds in Hawaii. It identified important characteristics of growth and will be helpful in the design of appropriate activities to prevent overweight.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Public Health Sciences and Epidemiology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, 1960 East West Rd, Biomed C-103, Honolulu, HI 96822-2319, USA. gigliola@hawaii.edu

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Acculturation
    Age Distribution
    Analysis of Variance
    Asian Continental Ancestry Group
    Body Height
    Body Mass Index
    Body Weight
    Child Nutrition Disorders
    Child, Preschool
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Ethnic Groups
    Female
    Hawaii
    Humans
    Infant
    Male
    Nutrition Surveys
    Obesity
    Oceanic Ancestry Group
    Prevalence
    Risk Factors
    Social Class

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15499358

    Citation

    Baruffi, Gigliola, et al. "Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Overweight Among Young Children in Hawaii." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 11, 2004, pp. 1701-7.
    Baruffi G, Hardy CJ, Waslien CI, et al. Ethnic differences in the prevalence of overweight among young children in Hawaii. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(11):1701-7.
    Baruffi, G., Hardy, C. J., Waslien, C. I., Uyehara, S. J., & Krupitsky, D. (2004). Ethnic differences in the prevalence of overweight among young children in Hawaii. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(11), pp. 1701-7.
    Baruffi G, et al. Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Overweight Among Young Children in Hawaii. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(11):1701-7. PubMed PMID: 15499358.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Ethnic differences in the prevalence of overweight among young children in Hawaii. AU - Baruffi,Gigliola, AU - Hardy,Charles J, AU - Waslien,Carol I, AU - Uyehara,Sue J, AU - Krupitsky,Dmitry, PY - 2004/10/23/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/23/entrez SP - 1701 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To compare the prevalence of overweight among young children of different ethnic backgrounds and describe the age pattern of overweight in early childhood. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 21,911 children, 12 to 59 months old, participating in the Hawaii Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children in 1997-1998. They were grouped in eight ethnic categories. For 1-year-olds we defined overweight as weight-for-age at the 95th percentile or more and underweight as weight-for-age at less than the 10th percentile. For 2- to 4-year-olds overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) at the 95th percentile or more, underweight as BMI less than 10th percentile, tall stature as height-for-age at the 95th percentile or more, and short stature as height-for-age at less than the 10th percentile. The National Center for Health Statistics 2000 growth charts were the reference values. The analysis included bivariate and multivariate methods. RESULTS: Large differences were found among ethnic groups. Among 1-year-olds, Samoans were the heaviest (17.5% overweight) and Filipinos the lightest (30.2% underweight). Among 2- to 4-year-olds, Samoans were the heaviest (27.0% overweight) and the tallest (16.9% tall), whereas Asians were the lightest (12.2% underweight), and Filipinos the shortest (19.0% short). Hawaiians and Asians also had a high percentage of short children (13.6% and 12.2%, respectively). Prevalence of overweight in all 2- to 4-year-olds was more than the expected 5%, especially for Samoans, Filipinos, Hawaiians, and Asians. At age 2 to 4 years, overweight was almost twice as prevalent as at age 1. Multivariate analysis showed that ethnicity (Samoan) had the strongest independent association with weight-for-age percentile, BMI, and overweight in the two age groups, followed by birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study of overweight among children of Asian and Pacific Island backgrounds in Hawaii. It identified important characteristics of growth and will be helpful in the design of appropriate activities to prevent overweight. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15499358/Ethnic_differences_in_the_prevalence_of_overweight_among_young_children_in_Hawaii_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822304013999 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -