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Food safety: emerging trends in foodborne illness surveillance and prevention.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Nov; 104(11):1708-17.JA

Abstract

Between 250 and 350 million Americans are estimated to suffer acute gastroenteritis annually, with 25% to 30% thought to be caused by foodborne illnesses. Most vulnerable to foodborne diseases are elderly people, pregnant women, immune-compromised people, and children. While bacterial causes such as Salmonella are widely recognized and monitored as foodborne infections, other important bacterial causes such as Clostridium perfringens , Bacillus cereus , and Staphylococcus aureus are less well known. While the majority of cases of foodborne diseases are of unknown cause, bacteria and viruses are the most likely causative agents. Caliciviridae (Norwalk-like) virus cases are more difficult to identify, but represent the most common cause of known and probably unknown cases. Fresh produce has to be added to the traditional list of foods requiring careful selection and handling to prevent foodborne disease. To assess the disease burden in the United States, morbidity and mortality surveillance activities are done by several networks and systems with collaboration among federal agencies and health departments. Not all important causes are being equally monitored. Critical behaviors by food processors, food retailers, foodservice personnel, and consumers can reduce the risk of foodborne illness episodes. Dietetics professionals can more readily monitor new developments and update knowledge and practice through online resources.

Authors+Show Affiliations

USDA, ARS, Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative, 900 S Shackleford Rd, Suite 509, Little Rock, AR 72211, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15499359

Citation

McCabe-Sellers, Beverly J., and Samuel E. Beattie. "Food Safety: Emerging Trends in Foodborne Illness Surveillance and Prevention." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 104, no. 11, 2004, pp. 1708-17.
McCabe-Sellers BJ, Beattie SE. Food safety: emerging trends in foodborne illness surveillance and prevention. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(11):1708-17.
McCabe-Sellers, B. J., & Beattie, S. E. (2004). Food safety: emerging trends in foodborne illness surveillance and prevention. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 104(11), 1708-17.
McCabe-Sellers BJ, Beattie SE. Food Safety: Emerging Trends in Foodborne Illness Surveillance and Prevention. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004;104(11):1708-17. PubMed PMID: 15499359.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food safety: emerging trends in foodborne illness surveillance and prevention. AU - McCabe-Sellers,Beverly J, AU - Beattie,Samuel E, PY - 2004/10/23/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/23/entrez SP - 1708 EP - 17 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 104 IS - 11 N2 - Between 250 and 350 million Americans are estimated to suffer acute gastroenteritis annually, with 25% to 30% thought to be caused by foodborne illnesses. Most vulnerable to foodborne diseases are elderly people, pregnant women, immune-compromised people, and children. While bacterial causes such as Salmonella are widely recognized and monitored as foodborne infections, other important bacterial causes such as Clostridium perfringens , Bacillus cereus , and Staphylococcus aureus are less well known. While the majority of cases of foodborne diseases are of unknown cause, bacteria and viruses are the most likely causative agents. Caliciviridae (Norwalk-like) virus cases are more difficult to identify, but represent the most common cause of known and probably unknown cases. Fresh produce has to be added to the traditional list of foods requiring careful selection and handling to prevent foodborne disease. To assess the disease burden in the United States, morbidity and mortality surveillance activities are done by several networks and systems with collaboration among federal agencies and health departments. Not all important causes are being equally monitored. Critical behaviors by food processors, food retailers, foodservice personnel, and consumers can reduce the risk of foodborne illness episodes. Dietetics professionals can more readily monitor new developments and update knowledge and practice through online resources. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15499359/Food_safety:_emerging_trends_in_foodborne_illness_surveillance_and_prevention_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822304014002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -