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Nutritional status and dietary intake of children with sickle cell anemia.
Am J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 1992; 14(1):57-61AJ

Abstract

The nutritional status and dietary intake of children with sickle cell anemia were examined to confirm the presence of deficiencies. Nine children with sickle cell anemia and 19 controls were assessed. Resting energy expenditure was measured with open circuit indirect calorimetry and body composition was estimated from skinfold measurements. Three-day food records were analyzed for protein, zinc, vitamin A, folic acid, and iron content. Serum vitamin A, red blood cell zinc, red blood cell folate, serum folate, serum ferritin, hematocrit, total urine nitrogen, and 24-h urine creatinine levels were measured. The children with sickle cell anemia were leaner, weighed less, and had lower red blood cell zinc levels, lower serum vitamin A levels, lower urine nitrogen levels, and greater resting energy expenditure than controls. Serum and red blood cell folate levels were within normal ranges and similar to controls. The serum ferritin level was higher than controls and higher than normal for age. Dietary intake of energy and protein was more than that of controls, and dietary intake of zinc, vitamin A, folic acid, and iron was similar to that of controls and adequate compared to the Recommended Dietary Allowances. Further studies are needed to explain the physical and biochemical differences seen in children with sickle cell anemia despite dietary intakes that appear to be adequate and similar to those of controls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4354.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1550264

Citation

Gray, N T., et al. "Nutritional Status and Dietary Intake of Children With Sickle Cell Anemia." The American Journal of Pediatric Hematology/oncology, vol. 14, no. 1, 1992, pp. 57-61.
Gray NT, Bartlett JM, Kolasa KM, et al. Nutritional status and dietary intake of children with sickle cell anemia. Am J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1992;14(1):57-61.
Gray, N. T., Bartlett, J. M., Kolasa, K. M., Marcuard, S. P., Holbrook, C. T., & Horner, R. D. (1992). Nutritional status and dietary intake of children with sickle cell anemia. The American Journal of Pediatric Hematology/oncology, 14(1), pp. 57-61.
Gray NT, et al. Nutritional Status and Dietary Intake of Children With Sickle Cell Anemia. Am J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 1992;14(1):57-61. PubMed PMID: 1550264.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutritional status and dietary intake of children with sickle cell anemia. AU - Gray,N T, AU - Bartlett,J M, AU - Kolasa,K M, AU - Marcuard,S P, AU - Holbrook,C T, AU - Horner,R D, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez SP - 57 EP - 61 JF - The American journal of pediatric hematology/oncology JO - Am J Pediatr Hematol Oncol VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - The nutritional status and dietary intake of children with sickle cell anemia were examined to confirm the presence of deficiencies. Nine children with sickle cell anemia and 19 controls were assessed. Resting energy expenditure was measured with open circuit indirect calorimetry and body composition was estimated from skinfold measurements. Three-day food records were analyzed for protein, zinc, vitamin A, folic acid, and iron content. Serum vitamin A, red blood cell zinc, red blood cell folate, serum folate, serum ferritin, hematocrit, total urine nitrogen, and 24-h urine creatinine levels were measured. The children with sickle cell anemia were leaner, weighed less, and had lower red blood cell zinc levels, lower serum vitamin A levels, lower urine nitrogen levels, and greater resting energy expenditure than controls. Serum and red blood cell folate levels were within normal ranges and similar to controls. The serum ferritin level was higher than controls and higher than normal for age. Dietary intake of energy and protein was more than that of controls, and dietary intake of zinc, vitamin A, folic acid, and iron was similar to that of controls and adequate compared to the Recommended Dietary Allowances. Further studies are needed to explain the physical and biochemical differences seen in children with sickle cell anemia despite dietary intakes that appear to be adequate and similar to those of controls. SN - 0192-8562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1550264/Nutritional_status_and_dietary_intake_of_children_with_sickle_cell_anemia_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=1550264.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -