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Do periodic leg movements influence patients' perception of sleep quality?
Sleep Med. 2004 Nov; 5(6):597-600.SM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS) are a common finding in various sleep disorders. Whether PLMS are an epiphenomenon or are causally related to the presence of sleep-wake disturbances is still being debated. We investigated the relationship of the occurrence of PLMS to patients' perception of sleep quality during a night of polysomnography in various sleep disorders.

METHODS

The retrospective evaluation included PLMS recordings over two nights of 78 consecutive patients diagnosed with a restless legs syndrome, primary insomnia or insomnia associated with a psychiatric disorder. The subjects' perception of sleep during the polysomnography night was assessed by the subscale 'sleep quality' of the validated self-rating sleep questionnaire SFA (SFA-SQ).

RESULTS

SFA-SQ scores correlated with the PLMS index (number of PLMS per hour of sleep) only in patients with restless legs syndrome during the first of the two nights investigated (r=-0.464, P<0.01). PLMS appear to have a low impact on the subjects' perception of sleep quality. The correlation of subjective sleep quality to PLMS index in the first of the two investigated nights in RLS patients may reflect an adaptation effect.

CONCLUSION

The results of our study favor the hypothesis that PLMS most likely are not the primary cause of sleep disturbances in these patient groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hauptstrasse 5, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany. magdolna_hornyak@psyallg.ukl.uni-freiburg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15511708

Citation

Hornyak, Magdolna, et al. "Do Periodic Leg Movements Influence Patients' Perception of Sleep Quality?" Sleep Medicine, vol. 5, no. 6, 2004, pp. 597-600.
Hornyak M, Riemann D, Voderholzer U. Do periodic leg movements influence patients' perception of sleep quality? Sleep Med. 2004;5(6):597-600.
Hornyak, M., Riemann, D., & Voderholzer, U. (2004). Do periodic leg movements influence patients' perception of sleep quality? Sleep Medicine, 5(6), 597-600.
Hornyak M, Riemann D, Voderholzer U. Do Periodic Leg Movements Influence Patients' Perception of Sleep Quality. Sleep Med. 2004;5(6):597-600. PubMed PMID: 15511708.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do periodic leg movements influence patients' perception of sleep quality? AU - Hornyak,Magdolna, AU - Riemann,Dieter, AU - Voderholzer,Ulrich, PY - 2004/05/28/received PY - 2004/07/20/revised PY - 2004/07/21/accepted PY - 2004/10/30/pubmed PY - 2005/3/23/medline PY - 2004/10/30/entrez SP - 597 EP - 600 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 5 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS) are a common finding in various sleep disorders. Whether PLMS are an epiphenomenon or are causally related to the presence of sleep-wake disturbances is still being debated. We investigated the relationship of the occurrence of PLMS to patients' perception of sleep quality during a night of polysomnography in various sleep disorders. METHODS: The retrospective evaluation included PLMS recordings over two nights of 78 consecutive patients diagnosed with a restless legs syndrome, primary insomnia or insomnia associated with a psychiatric disorder. The subjects' perception of sleep during the polysomnography night was assessed by the subscale 'sleep quality' of the validated self-rating sleep questionnaire SFA (SFA-SQ). RESULTS: SFA-SQ scores correlated with the PLMS index (number of PLMS per hour of sleep) only in patients with restless legs syndrome during the first of the two nights investigated (r=-0.464, P<0.01). PLMS appear to have a low impact on the subjects' perception of sleep quality. The correlation of subjective sleep quality to PLMS index in the first of the two investigated nights in RLS patients may reflect an adaptation effect. CONCLUSION: The results of our study favor the hypothesis that PLMS most likely are not the primary cause of sleep disturbances in these patient groups. SN - 1389-9457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15511708/Do_periodic_leg_movements_influence_patients'_perception_of_sleep_quality L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1389-9457(04)00126-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -