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Arachidonic acid in adipose tissue is associated with nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in the central valley of Costa Rica.
J Nutr. 2004 Nov; 134(11):3095-9.JN

Abstract

Arachidonic acid (AA), a precursor of prothrombotic eicosanoids, is potentially atherogenic, but epidemiologic data are scarce. We evaluated the hypothesis that increased AA in adipose tissue is associated with increased risk of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction (MI), and if so, whether this association is related to dietary or adipose tissue linoleic acid. We studied the association between AA and MI in 466 cases of a first nonfatal acute MI, matched on age, gender, and residence to 466 population controls. Fatty acids (FA) were assessed by GC in adipose tissue samples collected from all subjects. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI were calculated from multivariate conditional logistic regression models. Subjects in the highest quintile of adipose tissue AA (0.64% of total FA) had a higher risk of nonfatal acute MI than those in the lowest quintile (0.29% of total FA), after adjusting for potential confounders including (n-3) and trans FAs (OR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.53, P for trend = 0.026). Adipose tissue AA was not correlated with dietary AA (r = 0.07), linoleic acid (r = 0.04), or other dietary (n-6) FAs, or with adipose tissue linoleic acid (r = -0.07). These data suggest that the association between MI and adipose tissue AA is not related to dietary intake of (n-6) FAs including linoleic acid. Better understanding of the metabolic factors that increase AA in adipose tissue is urgently needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15514281

Citation

Baylin, Ana, and Hannia Campos. "Arachidonic Acid in Adipose Tissue Is Associated With Nonfatal Acute Myocardial Infarction in the Central Valley of Costa Rica." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 134, no. 11, 2004, pp. 3095-9.
Baylin A, Campos H. Arachidonic acid in adipose tissue is associated with nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in the central valley of Costa Rica. J Nutr. 2004;134(11):3095-9.
Baylin, A., & Campos, H. (2004). Arachidonic acid in adipose tissue is associated with nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in the central valley of Costa Rica. The Journal of Nutrition, 134(11), 3095-9.
Baylin A, Campos H. Arachidonic Acid in Adipose Tissue Is Associated With Nonfatal Acute Myocardial Infarction in the Central Valley of Costa Rica. J Nutr. 2004;134(11):3095-9. PubMed PMID: 15514281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Arachidonic acid in adipose tissue is associated with nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in the central valley of Costa Rica. AU - Baylin,Ana, AU - Campos,Hannia, PY - 2004/10/30/pubmed PY - 2004/12/16/medline PY - 2004/10/30/entrez SP - 3095 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 134 IS - 11 N2 - Arachidonic acid (AA), a precursor of prothrombotic eicosanoids, is potentially atherogenic, but epidemiologic data are scarce. We evaluated the hypothesis that increased AA in adipose tissue is associated with increased risk of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction (MI), and if so, whether this association is related to dietary or adipose tissue linoleic acid. We studied the association between AA and MI in 466 cases of a first nonfatal acute MI, matched on age, gender, and residence to 466 population controls. Fatty acids (FA) were assessed by GC in adipose tissue samples collected from all subjects. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI were calculated from multivariate conditional logistic regression models. Subjects in the highest quintile of adipose tissue AA (0.64% of total FA) had a higher risk of nonfatal acute MI than those in the lowest quintile (0.29% of total FA), after adjusting for potential confounders including (n-3) and trans FAs (OR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.53, P for trend = 0.026). Adipose tissue AA was not correlated with dietary AA (r = 0.07), linoleic acid (r = 0.04), or other dietary (n-6) FAs, or with adipose tissue linoleic acid (r = -0.07). These data suggest that the association between MI and adipose tissue AA is not related to dietary intake of (n-6) FAs including linoleic acid. Better understanding of the metabolic factors that increase AA in adipose tissue is urgently needed. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15514281/Arachidonic_acid_in_adipose_tissue_is_associated_with_nonfatal_acute_myocardial_infarction_in_the_central_valley_of_Costa_Rica_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/134.11.3095 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -